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I am an underground journalist interested in unearthing our built world's buried history...

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RotoGrate Technicolor

A colorful boiler is a happy boiler!  RotoGrate systems remove ashes from the boiler firebox by revolving the bottom of the system to let the fly ash drop into a hopper.  This greatly increases boiler efficiency.
A colorful boiler is a happy boiler! RotoGrate systems remove ashes from the boiler firebox by revolving the bottom of the system to let the fly ash drop into a hopper. This greatly increases boiler efficiency.

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Much of the plant depended on steam, not only for heat but for mechanical power.
The hole used to hold a ducted air turbine to blast the fresh stuff deep underground. Belt-driven by a giant motor in the adjacent room, a short list of activation instructions is titled, "Belden Fan," so-named for Judge Belden, then man who discovered Iron Mask Mine.
The left wall is stacked high with wooden crates holding spools. Tags hang on machines describing the last batch of silk the mill ever produced.
It was on my last (and probably final) trip to the factory that I found a tiny little fire door in the corner of a room I had not spent much time in. Behind that door was this beautiful vintage sign, part of the later (post-textile) history of Wilson Bros. Ain't she pretty?
David Aho, the owner of Mitchell Engine House, poses beside the boiler.
Ready for some science? Strap-in and get your goggles.
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    A decaying door of the Medical Director for the unit. Because this is from one of the outbuildings and not Administration, I doubt that this was the Medical Director of Norwich State Hospital's office.

    Between 1904 and 1996, Norwich State Hospital was home to some of Connecticut's most difficult mental cases.

    Two of the terminal elevators in Port Arthur. Taken from Saskatchewan Wheat Pool 4B; Elevator 4A on the left, Viterra C (former UGG-H) on the right. I like this image because you can make out the former footprint of Union Elevator, which would have blocked the view of Viterra.

    Built in 1923 as a major terminal elevator, it would go on to have booms and busts. By 'boom', I mean, it had the nasty habit of exploding.

    A fire insurance map from 1908 showing how the elevators connect.

    At its peak, Port Arthur and Fort William was home to more than 30 elevators at once. Some of them remain, but many are abandoned.