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I am an underground journalist interested in unearthing our built world's buried history...

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Dockworks Piano

Play on, Hunter. (Two keys worked.)
Play on, Hunter. (Two keys worked.)

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A broken television on the main floor. The remains of the plaster ceiling and walls are powdered on the floor.
Overgrown sheds and a little swinging I-beam to help lift components out of broken machines.
The steam-powered hoist that pulled ore and dropped men from the mine.  Note the hydraulic-operated brake on top with its massive brake pad.
The organ and bits of glass that have lost their way. Try not to see the upside-down wooden cross dangling from the stained-glass-crown on the church's front side. Of course, it's to keep the loose panes from falling out onto the road in wind, but at the same time...
Looking from the crane cab in between the dual-bridge gantry crane... an interesting design that I have not found in many places.  The slits in the opposite wall is where the cables from the mine hoist motors would go out to meet the headframe.
This is a great example of a combination rock house; the silos below used to fill trains with ore dropped from mine cars pulled to the top of the structure.
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    A decaying door of the Medical Director for the unit. Because this is from one of the outbuildings and not Administration, I doubt that this was the Medical Director of Norwich State Hospital's office.

    Between 1904 and 1996, Norwich State Hospital was home to some of Connecticut's most difficult mental cases.

    Two of the terminal elevators in Port Arthur. Taken from Saskatchewan Wheat Pool 4B; Elevator 4A on the left, Viterra C (former UGG-H) on the right. I like this image because you can make out the former footprint of Union Elevator, which would have blocked the view of Viterra.

    Built in 1923 as a major terminal elevator, it would go on to have booms and busts. By 'boom', I mean, it had the nasty habit of exploding.

    A fire insurance map from 1908 showing how the elevators connect.

    At its peak, Port Arthur and Fort William was home to more than 30 elevators at once. Some of them remain, but many are abandoned.