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I am an underground journalist interested in unearthing our built world's buried history...

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Heat Treated

Asbestos-cord-wrapped glass tongs piled in a shed next to the pouring line.
Asbestos-cord-wrapped glass tongs piled in a shed next to the pouring line.

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Asbestos rope isn't something you can buy at Home Depot anymore, but it's fire and heat resistant stuff; great for industrial work, like in a sugar mill.
Shelves in in the coloring department, where hundreds of different mixer lids are splashed with hardened glass dyes. Color thanks to a yellow-tinted skylight.
Spare spools on the throwing line.
Where walls were redacted, plastic sheets rose to isolate the asbestos abatement sections from the steam turbines, awaiting their disassembly.
Latin; to grow. Root of the English word 'surge'.
The hoist signal dangling beside the modern mine shaft would ring a bell next to the giant electric motors that would send the men and machinery into the underground.
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    A decaying door of the Medical Director for the unit. Because this is from one of the outbuildings and not Administration, I doubt that this was the Medical Director of Norwich State Hospital's office.

    Between 1904 and 1996, Norwich State Hospital was home to some of Connecticut's most difficult mental cases.

    Two of the terminal elevators in Port Arthur. Taken from Saskatchewan Wheat Pool 4B; Elevator 4A on the left, Viterra C (former UGG-H) on the right. I like this image because you can make out the former footprint of Union Elevator, which would have blocked the view of Viterra.

    Built in 1923 as a major terminal elevator, it would go on to have booms and busts. By 'boom', I mean, it had the nasty habit of exploding.

    A fire insurance map from 1908 showing how the elevators connect.

    At its peak, Port Arthur and Fort William was home to more than 30 elevators at once. Some of them remain, but many are abandoned.