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I am an underground journalist interested in unearthing our built world's buried history...

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Hangers On

A pipe bracket seems to have rusted off of the ceiling.
A pipe bracket seems to have rusted off of the ceiling.

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The entry point for the painting shed on the top floor. Cars would have a few feet in between them before they entered. Separate sheds would prime and add color.
A side view of the oven pusher from the ground. The tallest coal bunker looks tiny in the distance, though on the scale of the factory it's practically on top of me as I'm taking the picture.
Looking at the boarded exterior of the newer area of the orphanage from its 1914 section.
From the perspective of the rail yard.  The approach, not pictured here, has been taken off long ago to make room for a new taconite storage facility.
This was one of two personelle skyways that went between production line offices. It's easy to tell because it's not reinforced for machinery to travel through it. I also like that it's a double-decker, so to speak.
Power-up to cool down... would have been nice on the hot day I climbed on top of this machine.
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    A decaying door of the Medical Director for the unit. Because this is from one of the outbuildings and not Administration, I doubt that this was the Medical Director of Norwich State Hospital's office.

    Between 1904 and 1996, Norwich State Hospital was home to some of Connecticut's most difficult mental cases.

    Two of the terminal elevators in Port Arthur. Taken from Saskatchewan Wheat Pool 4B; Elevator 4A on the left, Viterra C (former UGG-H) on the right. I like this image because you can make out the former footprint of Union Elevator, which would have blocked the view of Viterra.

    Built in 1923 as a major terminal elevator, it would go on to have booms and busts. By 'boom', I mean, it had the nasty habit of exploding.

    A fire insurance map from 1908 showing how the elevators connect.

    At its peak, Port Arthur and Fort William was home to more than 30 elevators at once. Some of them remain, but many are abandoned.