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Bayfront Fair

Summertime is when Duluth goes to the lakeside to listen to music, visit traveling fairs, and talk to neighbors about the smell of the lake. As seen from the castle walls.
Summertime is when Duluth goes to the lakeside to listen to music, visit traveling fairs, and talk to neighbors about the smell of the lake. As seen from the castle walls.

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Looking at ADM-Delmar #4, #1 and Kurth from the Meal Storage Elevator at sunset on one of the warmer days of December. Note the graffiti "United Crushers" that gave the big elevator its common name among locals. Also, Harris Machinery is sitting in the lower-left corner, awaiting word of its next use.
The stainless steel bits are part of the grain dryer added in the 1940s. The workhouse itself (the larger tower) was a dedicated Cleaning House, meaning that grain passed through both these buildings to be rid of dust, dirt and extra moisture before storage. In the foreground is the old ADM locker room and pipe department.
A profile view of the Administration building from the former patient entrance into the Women's Ward offices.  The Men's Ward also had a wonderfully-carved entryway, but it's been blocked from the facade by an ugly new administration building.
Taken from the rooftop looking toward downtown, a hometown, a river town.
On the wooden walkway that covers the distance between dock ends, a few lights are yet unbroken. The deck serves as a way for men to reach the sides of the dock to tie-in ships that were loading as well as a way to oversee ships that were loaded as they left, as they were very low-riding once loaded. The walkway is elevated partly to keep it above wave crests in storms. Allouez' walkways are much lower and, as a result, have been mostly destroyed in the intervening bad weather since that complex's abandonment.
A matrix panorama of the brewhouse staircase, post-scrapping. So pretty...
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    A decaying door of the Medical Director for the unit. Because this is from one of the outbuildings and not Administration, I doubt that this was the Medical Director of Norwich State Hospital's office.

    Between 1904 and 1996, Norwich State Hospital was home to some of Connecticut's most difficult mental cases.

    Two of the terminal elevators in Port Arthur. Taken from Saskatchewan Wheat Pool 4B; Elevator 4A on the left, Viterra C (former UGG-H) on the right. I like this image because you can make out the former footprint of Union Elevator, which would have blocked the view of Viterra.

    Built in 1923 as a major terminal elevator, it would go on to have booms and busts. By 'boom', I mean, it had the nasty habit of exploding.

    A fire insurance map from 1908 showing how the elevators connect.

    At its peak, Port Arthur and Fort William was home to more than 30 elevators at once. Some of them remain, but many are abandoned.