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I am an underground journalist interested in unearthing our built world's buried history...

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Birch Takeover

Trees between duplexes overshadow the buildings they were planted to shield; revenge for the boards on the windows.
Trees between duplexes overshadow the buildings they were planted to shield; revenge for the boards on the windows.

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In the back of the warehouse is the old incinerator, probably used to destroy kegs that could not be reused.
The man behind the curtain watches, but doesn't say anything. Probably the smartest one in the room.
Looking into the kitchen from the living room at what was too heavy to move when the residents were evicted.
Looking from the powerhouse across to the old Electrical Assembly side of the plant that manufactured products like thermostats.  Most of the complex is connected by skyway and tunnel systems.
A quick vertical panorama taken on my back at the sweet spot of a great summer sunset. On the skylight is the torch-cut catwalk that used to link the outside of the smokestacks that vented the cupolas.
Looking at the ghost sign from a rust-locked cement conveyor that linked the silos with a packing warehouse.
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    A decaying door of the Medical Director for the unit. Because this is from one of the outbuildings and not Administration, I doubt that this was the Medical Director of Norwich State Hospital's office.

    Between 1904 and 1996, Norwich State Hospital was home to some of Connecticut's most difficult mental cases.

    Two of the terminal elevators in Port Arthur. Taken from Saskatchewan Wheat Pool 4B; Elevator 4A on the left, Viterra C (former UGG-H) on the right. I like this image because you can make out the former footprint of Union Elevator, which would have blocked the view of Viterra.

    Built in 1923 as a major terminal elevator, it would go on to have booms and busts. By 'boom', I mean, it had the nasty habit of exploding.

    A fire insurance map from 1908 showing how the elevators connect.

    At its peak, Port Arthur and Fort William was home to more than 30 elevators at once. Some of them remain, but many are abandoned.