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The New Osborn Block

It is unclear when the 'Superior Warehouse Company' sign was put up, but it was likely around 1916-1917, when maps indicate it served as a dry goods warehouse, operated by Twohy-Eimon Mercantile Company. The Sivertson sign was likely added in the mid-1980s. In this image I tried to preserve the colors the bricks turn at sunset.
It is unclear when the 'Superior Warehouse Company' sign was put up, but it was likely around 1916-1917, when maps indicate it served as a dry goods warehouse, operated by Twohy-Eimon Mercantile Company. The Sivertson sign was likely added in the mid-1980s. In this image I tried to preserve the colors the bricks turn at sunset.

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Like many mill-style buildings of the time, the Twohy's loading doors (in this case, the delivery wagon doors) opened to an elevator shaft. This design cut down on loading time, as long as the elevator was operational. Of course, if it was otherwise occupied, there could be no traffic through the exterior doors!
Beautiful belt wheels above the grain cribs. Getting to the spot where this was taken is now imposible, and I don't know whether these remain or not anymore.
One of the many fireproof bridges connecting the factory sections, one way to prevent fires from spreading throughout the plant.
Standing on the ruins of the former sister dock, looking back at the soon-to-be-demolished family member.  The pilings I stood on for the shot were those of the Chicago and North Western RR #3 which was dismantled in 1960 and used to be 2,040-feet long.
This was taken before the top of the docks really started to rot-out; now this stretch past the crane is distinctly unsafe to cross.  Still, you can't beat the view of Dock #2 winding into the distance, where the approach is chopped-off before the yard used to extend.
More than half a century of plans rot in the shadows, seemingly useless.
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    Soo Line and Bridgeman's, Lake Superior Railroad Museum

    In mid-1880s, a few men began tunneling under downtown Duluth looking for a fortune. Now there's no trace of their labor under the Point of Rocks, is there?

    The downtown Duluth Soo Line depot, abandoned in 1961. Credit Duluth News Tribune Attic.

    In 1910, after three years of digging and blasting, workers finished their giant tunnel from West End right into downtown Duluth. It's still there, hiding.

    The east portal, looking toward Nopeming Junction and away from the US Steel ruins and Duluth's ore docks.

    It started as a rumor, then I heard it over and over--there was an abandoned train tunnel outside Duluth.