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I am an underground journalist interested in unearthing our built world's buried history...

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Belden Fan

The hole used to hold a ducted air turbine to blast the fresh stuff deep underground. Belt-driven by a giant motor in the adjacent room, a short list of activation instructions is titled, "Belden Fan," so-named for Judge Belden, then man who discovered Iron Mask Mine.
The hole used to hold a ducted air turbine to blast the fresh stuff deep underground. Belt-driven by a giant motor in the adjacent room, a short list of activation instructions is titled, "Belden Fan," so-named for Judge Belden, then man who discovered Iron Mask Mine.

Similar Images

Numbers on a pillar counted tank capacity for a removed water container; an unhinged door in an unhinged factory beguiles those looking for an exit.
Fluorescent lights peel back from the walls like caterpillars, rearing up and away from the glare of the sunflower-fans.
On the upper floors where the sunlight is yellow--the color of flour dust, once exposed to the elements.
Trees between duplexes overshadow the buildings they were planted to shield; revenge for the boards on the windows.
To move air around the non air-conditioned buildings, may of which date to the 1920s and 1930s, fans were mounted above the high door frames.
A wounded flour mill, muscled into the corner to keep out of the way.
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    A decaying door of the Medical Director for the unit. Because this is from one of the outbuildings and not Administration, I doubt that this was the Medical Director of Norwich State Hospital's office.

    Between 1904 and 1996, Norwich State Hospital was home to some of Connecticut's most difficult mental cases.

    Two of the terminal elevators in Port Arthur. Taken from Saskatchewan Wheat Pool 4B; Elevator 4A on the left, Viterra C (former UGG-H) on the right. I like this image because you can make out the former footprint of Union Elevator, which would have blocked the view of Viterra.

    Built in 1923 as a major terminal elevator, it would go on to have booms and busts. By 'boom', I mean, it had the nasty habit of exploding.

    A fire insurance map from 1908 showing how the elevators connect.

    At its peak, Port Arthur and Fort William was home to more than 30 elevators at once. Some of them remain, but many are abandoned.