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Dept 9136

The warped floors caught my eye in this room too--a symptom of turning off heat and not patching a leaking roof in the midwest.
The warped floors caught my eye in this room too--a symptom of turning off heat and not patching a leaking roof in the midwest.

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Looking from the crane cab in between the dual-bridge gantry crane... an interesting design that I have not found in many places.  The slits in the opposite wall is where the cables from the mine hoist motors would go out to meet the headframe.
A comrade lights-up where so many workers apparently congregated to do the same.
One of the prettier Humphry Manlifts in Minneapolis, in my opinion.
This picture is perhaps the most appropriate in its visual depiction of how unstable the mill was. 1. Note the lack of stairs on the spiral staircase; they're rusted and twisted apart, not simply cut off. 2. Notice the cracked concrete on the lower left corner; that was cracking as I was standing on it taking this photo, and don't think there's anything under that to begin to stop one's fall. 3. You're looking into an open elevator shaft; its safety cage is sliced away and wide open.
This was taken before the top of the docks really started to rot-out; now this stretch past the crane is distinctly unsafe to cross.  Still, you can't beat the view of Dock #2 winding into the distance, where the approach is chopped-off before the yard used to extend.
These racks lined many of the floors, although I couldn't decipher their purpose.  Tastes like duotone...
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    A decaying door of the Medical Director for the unit. Because this is from one of the outbuildings and not Administration, I doubt that this was the Medical Director of Norwich State Hospital's office.

    Between 1904 and 1996, Norwich State Hospital was home to some of Connecticut's most difficult mental cases.

    Two of the terminal elevators in Port Arthur. Taken from Saskatchewan Wheat Pool 4B; Elevator 4A on the left, Viterra C (former UGG-H) on the right. I like this image because you can make out the former footprint of Union Elevator, which would have blocked the view of Viterra.

    Built in 1923 as a major terminal elevator, it would go on to have booms and busts. By 'boom', I mean, it had the nasty habit of exploding.

    A fire insurance map from 1908 showing how the elevators connect.

    At its peak, Port Arthur and Fort William was home to more than 30 elevators at once. Some of them remain, but many are abandoned.