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Nightlight Named Zug

Zug Island is a US Steel plant just south of Detroit, and it really lights up the skyline.
Zug Island is a US Steel plant just south of Detroit, and it really lights up the skyline.

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Minecraft reference. This is the backroom of a company that made eyeglasses the old-fashioned way. In fact, some of the lens blanks were even left behind, under the piles of trash on the desks.
I'm very happy to have caught Marquette before it was completely destroyed. If you're wondering, it costs about $1,000,000 to demolish and elevator like this, and not that much work for the demo crews.
Molten copper pouring being a very dangerous thing to do by hand, this scale measured the load for the "Auto Caster" that actually formed the cooling copper in its molds.
A look upriver at the crane of the Port of Detroit, quiet for the night, and the Ambassador Bridge, always humming with Canadian traffic. Downtown Detroit is beautiful, if nobody told you.
Play on, Hunter. (Two keys worked.)
A classic Eveready, borrowed from Herb's office.
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    A decaying door of the Medical Director for the unit. Because this is from one of the outbuildings and not Administration, I doubt that this was the Medical Director of Norwich State Hospital's office.

    Between 1904 and 1996, Norwich State Hospital was home to some of Connecticut's most difficult mental cases.

    Two of the terminal elevators in Port Arthur. Taken from Saskatchewan Wheat Pool 4B; Elevator 4A on the left, Viterra C (former UGG-H) on the right. I like this image because you can make out the former footprint of Union Elevator, which would have blocked the view of Viterra.

    Built in 1923 as a major terminal elevator, it would go on to have booms and busts. By 'boom', I mean, it had the nasty habit of exploding.

    A fire insurance map from 1908 showing how the elevators connect.

    At its peak, Port Arthur and Fort William was home to more than 30 elevators at once. Some of them remain, but many are abandoned.