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Two-Faced Mill

After a short rainfall douses the mill in downtown Fergus Falls, the river next to the brick walls swells and the sounds of water overtakes the echos of the nearby bars. Reflections are on the foundation of the former distribution and rail building.

After a short rainfall douses the mill in downtown Fergus Falls, the river next to the brick walls swells and the sounds of water overtakes the echos of the nearby bars. Reflections are on the foundation of the former distribution and rail building. READ IT»

Similar Images

This is very likely the oldest image I have on the website; I took this in the early 2000s with my first camera when I was new to the hobby.  I still like it quite a lot.
Taken in 2005, before the arsons, overgrowth, graffiti, and demolitions. Enjoy.
The last trace of Mitchell, Minnesota is a pile of cans on the side of the main street, Mitchell Avenue. These will be recognizable for another century or so, for future history-minded explorers.
It's almost hard to tell whether the colors come from oil in the water or the colorful glass lit up by the Michigan sunset.
Near what we now call General Mills, pilings from the lost rail freighthouse rot in the harbor. In the background, Huron-Portland cement waits to be redeveloped.
Some of the rotting clothes were in boxes, split long ago from moisture. Others were just heaped in piles.
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    This wide skyway connected two of the inner factory buildings, where parts would have to be transported to keep the operation moving, which is why it is much wider than other bridges in the plant.

    Coffin factory funerals are not often so solemn. Read why this famous furniture factory closed after 160 years and see how it looks today. READ IT»

    Island Station, in the middle of the power house, in the middle of a thunder storm. Flapping pipe covers and sheets of ran penetrating one massive arched window and blasting through the other, as winds power through the building from the Mississippi. The sound of the thunder made every length of steel squeak under the pressure.

    This is my goodbye to a St. Paul power plant currently being demolished: ISLAND STATION. It served in a limited capacity from 1924 to 1973, but its iconic steel smokestack left an impression on me and thousands of other St. Paul residents, past and present. READ IT»

    The Osborn Block (front) and the Twohy (rear) at sunset. In the distance, you can almost make out Globe Elevators. One of my favorite photos of 2013.

    Since the 1890s, little has changed on North First Street. The Twohy and Osborn buildings have survived a century just a block off the beaten path, just out of sight of downtown. A few good stories hide there; these are some of them. READ IT»