chutes

Chute Fourteen

On first impression it might look like a funky mailbox, but trust me on this one; it’s a flour bolter chute. In flour milling, “bolting” means sifting the flour through successively smaller screens.

Chute-Side Catwalk

I wonder how sheltered workers on this mid-level catwalk that follows the ore chutes is in storms. Note the chunks of concrete stuck in the catwalk grates–the pockets (right) are falling apart.

ADM-Delmar #4- Lower Belt

One chute drops grain on a conveyor for storage in the north silo cluster, while another is ready to deposit the flow where the conveyor cannot reach. Instead of engineering the belt to trip in reverse, the silos under the workhouses have their own chutes.

Siftter Chutes

Before developers saw to cut and cut the flour mills inside Pillsbury, they stood at the ready beside various purposeful chutes the traversed the floors of between sorters. These machines were belt-driven by the power of Pillsbury’s Mississippi headraces and turbines, the force of which notoriously shook the building’s foundations themselves. The wheels would change the grade of the flour, or the size of the dust produced from crushing the kernels.

Tailings Boom I

Like a railgun pointed at the Rockies… the boom would direct tailings–junk rock–outside of the dredge pond.

Roller Mill Pulley

The right-pointing crank adjusts the rollers inside of the mill. How fine do you want your flour?

Ghost Signs on Consolidated D

It’s a mystery to me why this elevator has a Gold Medal Flour ghost sign. You can read it along with its obsolete monikers today.

Superior Elevator- Cupola

The cupola–the space above the silos–is surprisingly original. The building was too unstable for anyone to scrap it out. Seriously, the floor is a deathtrap.

Inside Gunnell Mine

Judging from old pictures and maps, raw ore was dumped through these hatches, stamped into a rough powder, and hastily sorted before sending the best ore to the mill. Mills charged by tons of rock sent to them, so it did not pay to send them obvious tails.

Kurth Malting- Mill City Fork

Sunrise over Mill Hell, and all of Kurth’s various skyways. The elevators in the foreground date to the mid-1920s, Electric Steel is behind and is a little earlier than that.

Tillston, MB- Five Roses Flour

“Five Roses” was the brand of flour that Lake of the Woods marketed. Later, this became another Manitoba Pool elevator. Notice the “POO” up top? It’s missing the ‘L’…

Lever

Depending on the position of the valve, flour could be routed from the filtering process back into a mill.

Oberon, MB

The iconic outline of a prairie sentinel. Quintessential rural industrial architecture.

Belt Thrower

A wounded flour mill, muscled into the corner to keep out of the way.

Dripping Rock Chute

Spring melt flows down the rusty rock house. In the background is the frame for the shaft.

Syrup Slide

The beet juice was boiled down to make a syrup, which would be drained down the trough to the crystalizers.

Dust Funnels

Dust explosions were a real risk for grain mills. These funnels helped to filter the air in the mill.

ADM-Delmar #4- Belt Spider

Every elevator has sets of these conveyor switches. Grain comes down through the top chute and the bottom chute rotates to move the flow onto various belts around the plant by gravity. The cross belt is another switch and the bridge belt brings the flow to the other half of the elevator.

Materials Yard Chutes

It is unclear whether this area was for coal dumping or ore dumping, though the huge dents in the steel plating suggests the latter.

Chute A-6

Atop Elevator ‘M’, formerly Cargill ‘O’.

Chutes on Dock 2

Water turned the taconite powder into a rusty, slippery paste… everywhere the water pooled up, doubling the beauty from certain special angles.

Vines in the Workshop

Across the walls of the brick repair shop, near where men and machine entered Shaft No. 3, vines, pipes, and graffiti battle unknowingly for visual prominence.

Collector 4

Pipes to channel nitrose (think nitro glycerine) infused acid through the building.

Shutterchutes

At the end of a conveyor belt and poised over a loading station, it’s easy to image the tinny sound of chicken feed sliding across the metal. Like sand on the old-fashioned stainless steel playground slides.

Dust Burner

It seems that the sawdust would be shot into a dust collector above the powerplant and burned.

MPE3- 3 Ship

A broken window looking through the First Aid Room and into the Control Room in charge of directing grain into ships. You can see one of the large conveyors on the right, clad in green. Chutes and staircases intertwine seemingly randomly through the big empty spaces.

Cracked Lake Superior

As wind and currents moved the ice around between the ore docks, the sounds of crunching echoed through the otherwise quiet bar.

Old Tanks

Looking from the mill at the old transfer elevator’s steel tanks.

Dust Collectors

The skyway’s steel substructure collapsed slightly, crushing part of the dust collectors.

Chutes

A staircase leads behind three of the dock chutes, seemingly to nowhere. The lower on the left held one end of a string of lights above the dock.

Holmfield, MB- Harrison Milling

The flour mill (rear) and its elevators. The taller elevator was moved here in 1955, when the Harrisons bought it from Federal, who declared it surplus. The smaller elevator replaced an earlier smaller warehouse in 1926. Taken shortly after dawn. This one picture made the drive worth it, for me. Medium Format.

Fragile Death Trap

To the right is the spiral staircase. This building had a definite “floor problem”.

Spring Melt and Chutes

Wind took the spring melt on the trees growing in taconite pellets and made it airborne. Loading chutes in the background.

Skyway

The old way to get to the elevator from the mill.

354

Looking across the catwalk behind the ore chutes, when they were up, and at the top of the ore chutes during loading.

Consolidated D/General Mills A

General Mills bought Consolidated Elevator’s “D” in 1943 and renamed it “A,” though no additional elevators have followed from that firm to date. Visible on the right is the first annex, built along with the elevator in 1909.

Dock 2 at Sunset

Winter skies over Allouez Bay. From a distance, it looks almost fragile.

Sunset Behind Dock

The ice reflects the blue sky on the rust. The sunset blasts through the concrete pillars holding it all up.

Conveyor 13

One of thousands in the complex. Part of a series of photographs where I capture the number “13” in industrial settings.

Materials Yard

Raab strolling where the coal and ore would be dumped by trains that traveled along the top of the concrete pilings.

These Things Fall

Looking across a skyway at the dust-collecting funnels, one of the few pieces of equipment that haven’t been completely decimated by time and the elements.

Grain Feeds

I tried to hide the graffiti from my photos, but sometimes it wasn’t possible.

Do Industry

The only good shot I have of the top of Battery A, in the upper left. Though it seemed to have been disused before its neighbor it had a lot less growth on it.

Ship at Allouez I

On top of the light hoop, 160-feet up, a ship comes into port, ready to load-up. If you look really close, you can see my shadow cast on the dock below, courtesy of the full moon.

End Chutes

If there was a problem with the conveyor belt, the grain would go out these chutes.

This Way and That

Chutes from a hundred machines interconnect to more machines and chutes on a dozen factory floors.

Tailings Boom II

…a better view of the huge tailings boom stretching outside of the tailings pond.

Lyons Boiler

Installed in 1904 at the center of the plant, this is one of two batteries of boilers. Being in Oshkosh, heat was very important to keeping labor moving in the cold months.

Bucket Lift

With the maintenance door open you can see the buckets on in the vertical conveyor.

Vintage Scale Hoppers

Two steel hoppers supported by counterweights and springs, which were used to weigh incoming grain loads before being deposited in the silos beneath this floor. Garner is another way to say “big measuring tank”, if you were wondering. I fell in love with all the tubes and chutes on this floor.

Grain Sorter

At the top of the elevator was a distribution room to direct the grain onto conveyor belts below.

Dust Collectors in Color

Sunset through a stained window in the headhouse made the floor feel like a heavy industrial Disney movie.

American Crane

A diesel crane and conveyor belt tripper are the major pieces of equipment that dominate the dock.

MPE3- Tripper

Without a conveyor belt, this tripper seems lost. The job of this machine was simply to take grains from the moving conveyor belt and eject it into the silos via the chutes on the sides. Note all the dust collection venting added to the machine to suck up any explosive grain dust.

Old Time Hauler

What looks to be a skip for repairing the dock, in the concrete steeple.