collapsing

Cooling Pool

A screen above the floor apparently shields workers from the disintegrating building.

Backfill Self-Portrait

Partier graffiti dates to when the caves were last open to the public; probably in the 1990s. This tunnel used to horseshoe between the brewery’s ice chute (left) and basement door (right, backfilled). Note the utility tunnel in the upper-right corner as well as the lighting brackets on the ceiling.

King- Ruined Office

A skyway 100 feet above this office crumbled one day. This is what happened when those two met. High-impact love.

Sketchy Skyway

This skyway, built to help seal off two parts of the complex during an out of control fire, was probably too rotten to burn by the time I saw it.

Third Floor Meets Second Floor

I wanted to see the third floor to get a better view, but the third floor had already been demolished. The old walls had cascaded down the staircases. This building is gone, now, as you can expect.

Ice Chute Lights

Although the caves deviated little in their year-round temperature, it was common to use blocks of ice to cool beer immediately before shipment. This is the ruins of the ice chute.

Last Two Buildings

The brick substation and the wooden storage shed are the last two structures from The Milwaukee Road’s operations at Loweth.

Sunday Lake Lock

An unintentional skylight makes the inside of the office glow, showing the inside of the front door and its strange lock.

Collapsed Glassworks

Snow weight collapsed this section of McKee… the newest section. The brick buildings always outlive cheap metal ones.

Skeletal Skyway

This ruined skyway looks like it should be at ground level because of the growth, but it’s actually the second floor of the building.

The Danger of Looking Up

Looking up from the train shed. The building was consistently crumbling and I wish I had worn a hard hat in this area.

Broken Rock House Rails-(C)SUSBTREET.org

From the door where mine carts were dumped into the Concentrator, the erosion around the former Santiago Tunnel on Treasure Mountain is obvious. The rails barely connect to the ground anymore.

Dress Forms

The women of the hospital made clothes for the other patients.

Glass-Top Drain

A strange sight: Part of the drain here seems to have had a skylight of glass, which has since been filled over. However, the collapsing ceiling began to create natural skylights of its own.

Puffer by Bibio

The roof was in bad shape, but too beautiful to avoid. This is the spot were I used to study medieval Latin.

Building 765B

The building collapsed except for the back room. The slats of the roof cast lines of light across the floor.

School Ruins

A damaged roof channeled rain onto the adobe walls, cutting them in half. In the distance, a preserved house and the ruins of the Colmor School.

Unintended Footprint

When I wasn’t paying enough attention on the rotten balcony, I accidentally put my foot through a rotten floorboard. I snapped a picture to remember the moment.

Miner’s Outhouse-(C)SUSBTREET.org

I’m not sure, actually, whether this was an outhouse (right), but it seems likely. In any case, it was connected by a covered staircase to the Bunk House (left). The soil here was not all tailings, so there is a bit of thick grass–almost the only in sight!

Say Remiss

For reasons unknown, this building’s concrete was designed a little thinly. It reminds me of a Chicago, IL building constructed during WWI when concrete and steel were strictly rationed and many buildings went up with insufficient superstructures. I do not have a build date for this one yet.

Inside Dogtown I

The bathtub fell into the basement, ala The Miller’s Tale. That’s right. Chaucer.

Building Wave

Snow weight collapsed this warhead assembly building. Now its warped roof looks like a wave.

Set the Pie on the Sill

In this ghost town where there were brick, wooden, and dirt-brick buildings, the latter fared the best by far.

Ampersand

In what Studebaker called the ‘Materials Building’ are these giant concrete bins of fine molding sand, there for casting metal parts using the molten metal from the adjoining building. On the far left side there is a train track and once upon a time a gantry crane traced the room under the roof

Broadway House Lights

“Place Tripod Here” my friends would say. But for me, it’s the money shot. Note the painting around the inside of the skylight.

Choir Loft

There’s no way an explorer, much less a choir, could stand here now. Since this picture was taken the roof has collapsed onto the loft.

Kate

Two versions of Detroit. One where buildings stand tall and proud, and one where they wilt under the sun. It’s an amazing juxtaposition.

2012 collapse

Additional Sacred Heart Building (1949) Collapse, 2012, Courtesy Chris Naffziger @ http://stlouispatina.blogspot.com/2011/12/st-marys-infirmary.html

Careful!

Will coming down “Darwin’s Ladder”.

Cutoff Ranch

An abandoned ranch on the east side of the tracks. This was not the Colmor Cutoff they were waiting for.

Neighborhood Dump

In front of the mine building the ground has opened up, showing a one-subterranean hallway. Locals seem to be using the dangerous hole as a trash dump.

Inside Prize Mine, Nevadaville

While the building looks uniform on the outside, inside it’s clearly divided between a hoist room and shaft room (seen here).

Foundry Basement

Below the factory floor is a network of hallways and tunnels, all flooded with water.

Loading Dock

A ruined platform on the railyard platform side of the warehouse.

Cupola Closeup

The last batch of molded metal stuck in the chute, this metallurgical furnace was falling apart brick by disintegrating brick b the time I got to it. On the upper floors there is a sophisticated network of vents and chimneys to make these little furnaces as hot as possible.

Ball Mills

Before the gold could be extracted, the rock was turned to powder. Depending on the size of the steel balls inside the mill, the rock would be reduced to a certain size. So, multiple mills were usually used in stages.

Hanging Duct

One of the cupola air intakes, rattled loose by the demolition downstairs, hangs stranded on the second floor. You can see that the floor I’m standing on in this picture used to extend all the way to the right wall. The blue paint on the wall made the climb absolutely worth it.

Gateways

A gateway for St. Louis as seen through a gateway (of sorts) in East St. Louis.

Blue Wall

After climbing the elevator shaft to the illusive second level, a new pallet of colors were revealed.

Lauder, MB

The ghost town of Lauder, Manitoba. It’s seen better days, but I bet the TV reception on the flatlands is great.

St. Peter’s Migration

Between the ice chute and the back of the north section of the cellars, a little pillar shows where a room used to be. The ceiling’s disintegration has since filled the space, which seems to be the last point of expansion in the cave–this was last carved in the mid-1840s.

Oversight in the Storm

If you look closely, you can see the rain dropping into the building. This is the part of the chapel with the collapsed roof–not the carvings on the choir loft.

Cave Brewery Entrance

In the far back of the cellars there are some old bottles. This arch shows an old entrance to the cellars, now collapsed.

Right of Way

A washout two thirds of the way down the tram gave me a place to relax in the thin air.