dirty

MG Bay

The pit on the left was one of two that accommodated the bottom half of the Motor Generators, which converted AC to DC.

Ogilvie’s- Ship Gallery Arch (Arista 100)

When the ship loaders were added, a doorway was cut through the metal silo to make a room for the grain handling equipment. Note the dust sensor in the corner of the torch-cut archway.

ADM-Delmar #4- Lower Belt

One chute drops grain on a conveyor for storage in the north silo cluster, while another is ready to deposit the flow where the conveyor cannot reach. Instead of engineering the belt to trip in reverse, the silos under the workhouses have their own chutes.

Ogilvie Elevator Sign

On the outside of the steel silos and headhouse is a riveted bulge that does not look like the silos. Inside is this elevator, a rudimentary (read: dangerous) and old (read: dangerous) freight elevator.

Three Charts

My favorite picture from the mills. These charts remind me of star charts or orbiting planets.

Operator’s Chair

The well-worn chair in one larry’s operator cab, next to an overgrown coke battery.

Swirl – (C)SUBSTREET

Generations of Two Harbors teens smoked their first weed in this abandoned building, in my estimation. Comment if I’m right!

Vintage Scale Hoppers

Two steel hoppers supported by counterweights and springs, which were used to weigh incoming grain loads before being deposited in the silos beneath this floor. Garner is another way to say “big measuring tank”, if you were wondering. I fell in love with all the tubes and chutes on this floor.

Avanti Elevator

The only way to get to the second floor–since demolition crews punched-out the staircases and ladders leading upwards–was to climb this elevator shaft. In the lower-left corner is a blower for the foundry furnaces.

Ghetto Courtyard

Sleeping bags mark this former courtyard as a crash pad for the local homeless.

Side of the Coating Line

Note the rails in the floor that guided cars to the coating line, the side of which is lined with the windows in the center of the image.

Mills Across the Street

The world’s biggest paper machine was installed here about a century before this photo was taken. The orange in the windows is the brick building across the street–the new part of the plant.

Boots

Rubber dock boots still sits under the desk in the dock office, near keys to rusted locks and files of fired employees.

Office Hallway

The only thing that signals that this was an office building, rather than another production floor, is the small amount of wood paneling that remains.

Frick

Two small generators connected to a Frick steam engine.

Warehouse Elevator – (C)SUBSTREET

One of the clusters of elevators. Doors would open on both sides so that vehicles could be moved through them if necessary. There is only one set of stairs in the whole building.

Replaced Planes

This building was responsible for storing and drying the barrels. Compare right.

God Loves Lime

In the Lime House, the sunset picked-up the last light of day to make this image. Lime is used in the beet sugar refinement process to reduce the acidity of the beet juice mixture.

Distiller Control Panel

One of the only remaining pieces of equipment in the distilling room is this green control panel on a bridge suspended in the middle of it all.

Ball and Rod Mills

Tucked-into the side of the concentration mill… these machines were meant to crush underground rock into a fine dust for mineral extraction.

Visiting Hours

The chair tried to leave, but found it had grown heavy with the weight of water and wood. Today, it shelters the mice and maggots.

Kegmaster’s Causeway

A mix of brick and stone construction where the stock house meets the cellars. The caves brought well water to the brewery and drained the refuse away, and the various sewer connections are visible here and tell the story of the company’s expansion above.

Belt-Driven Mill

The flour mill’s interior is really just a system of steel and rubber tubes that crush flour over and over in the gap. This mill was never run off of water power directly, but it used to generate power using the river.

White Pine Mine Ruin

These concrete blocks were formed to be solid mounts for machinery. All the metal was scrapped in the late 1990s, leaving these modern ruins. Seagulls love them.

Tailings

The last tailings on a broken conveyor belt.

Religious Row

The pigeons and raccoons have no use for these, so they will sit empty until snow or fire removes them by force.

Toy Piano

The stage had two pianos. Did they ever duel?

Ground Floor

The bottom of the elevator which seemed too modern for the building. The top of the elevator opens into open air, as the second floor has long since collapsed.

Silk Spools

There were bins with hundreds of spools in them in the basement.

80s Chairs

…when injection molding was the new thing that everyone was experimenting with.

Blue Wall

After climbing the elevator shaft to the illusive second level, a new pallet of colors were revealed.

Pump Room

Next to the generator room is the pump room, which moved steam around the complex.

Tailings Boom II

…a better view of the huge tailings boom stretching outside of the tailings pond.

MPE3- Tripper

Without a conveyor belt, this tripper seems lost. The job of this machine was simply to take grains from the moving conveyor belt and eject it into the silos via the chutes on the sides. Note all the dust collection venting added to the machine to suck up any explosive grain dust.

Evaporator Innards

Either the company was pulling parts from this evaporator to use as parts for other plants, or the last thing the workers did was to get this machine ready for the next campaign. Either way, plans changed.

Trashy Novel

A romance novel left by some worker–lunch break reading–now sits under a grease stick.

SWP4- Hole (Arista 100)

A me-sized hole in the half-demolished skyway looks about a story down to the ground. Step lightly. Arista 100.

Film Rooms

A series of interconnected offices that look like they hadn’t been painted in 40 years.

Eagle Mine Sign

I assume this sign used to sit near the highway that snakes around the mine and town.

Found Film

Perhaps this office was for a film studio or music producer.

Cheratte Obelysk

Looking at the headframe for Shaft 3 from the tower for Shaft 1. Below is the roof of the Dry House. It was hard to remind myself that these building have been abandoned longer than I’ve been alive.

Azure Tiles

The altar is gone, but the tile work around it isn’t.

Cracked Wall

I really like the way this high-ceilinged room is decaying. Well, decayed. It’s demolished now.

Syrup Slide

The beet juice was boiled down to make a syrup, which would be drained down the trough to the crystalizers.

Angel Wings

One of my favorite pictures of the tunnel. I am holding a bike rim and wearing a headlamp. My friend triggered the flash just behind my lower back. The fog is a temperature inversion at the entrance of the tunnel; it was 102 degrees outside of the tunnel and about 50 degrees inside, and humid.

Cotton Monorail Two

At the top of a skyway that brought fresh-dried cotton into the Nitrating House from the Cotton Dry House. How? Monorail, of course.

One Out in Aluminum

Aluminum spools replaced their wooden counterparts, later in the factory’s history.

Old Kettles

In a strange loft next to the brewhouse are these twin kettles, which seem much older than the main kettles in the brewhouse.

440 Volts

The secret sweet-yet-salty center of the nameless factoryscape. Home base, tuned to rule the AC and turn out Product X at record rates, I’m sure.

Backfill Self-Portrait

Partier graffiti dates to when the caves were last open to the public; probably in the 1990s. This tunnel used to horseshoe between the brewery’s ice chute (left) and basement door (right, backfilled). Note the utility tunnel in the upper-right corner as well as the lighting brackets on the ceiling.

Lever

Depending on the position of the valve, flour could be routed from the filtering process back into a mill.

Shaft No. 1 Hoisting Motor

One of the pair of motors that powered this mine shaft. In the 1950s, this shaft was designated a rescue shaft, and was only maintained for emergencies. One reason that Cheratte built Shaft 3 nearby was because these motors and infrastructure did not have the capacity that the giant mine below called for.

Roller Mill Pulley

The right-pointing crank adjusts the rollers inside of the mill. How fine do you want your flour?

Microphone

A familiar scene in Control Tower B, though the microphone has not been used for years.

Death Notecards

Each patient had a card of record that reported major events. Births, changes in diagnosis, and for some, death.

Blacksmith Shop Bench-(C)SUSBTREET.org

The blacksmith shop is pretty rugged looking. Through the door you can see the collapsed walkway that might have once connected to a building covering the Santiago Tunnel adit.

Happy Bacteria

Happy mine bacteria ‘chews’ away at one of the narrow gauge rail ties still embedded in the sand floor. The orange color is not a mistake of mine; it is the result of different minerals leeching into the water table and draining into the mine. Keep in mind that, about 100 feet above, is the Ford plant itself!

Spools

This picture typifies the industrial ideal of the early 20th century. More metal than air. More efficiency than beauty. More profits than people.

Bedframe

The view into one of the asylum rooms of Norwich Hospital. A long time ago, a window broke, letting the vines crawling up the bricks outside to move indoors and across the floor.

Dorm Hallway

Water damage dissolved the ceiling into sludge. Pillars remain, as do the plastic light covers, now on the floor.

Decorative Cast Iron Sink

Some parts of the doctor’s apartment in the Administration Tower were decidedly upscale. Look at the beautiful ironwork on that sink!

Trommel

The first step of the filtering process is being spun through this tube.

Tankless Brewhouse

Even without the kettles the Hamm’s brewhouse is beautifully lit, ornamented architecturally and begging for photographers to remember it.

Bunker

The only light in the ‘coffin’ of the Atlas E is that which leaks through the exhaust vents.

Annex Work Floor

The top of the annex was bare except for these holes into the silos below.

Hanging Duct

One of the cupola air intakes, rattled loose by the demolition downstairs, hangs stranded on the second floor. You can see that the floor I’m standing on in this picture used to extend all the way to the right wall. The blue paint on the wall made the climb absolutely worth it.

Bunker Beam

In one of the hundreds of bunkers across the busy highway from the empty plant ruins. Most did not have doors, but I got lucky on this one.

Kurth Malting- Cupola Arch

The sexiest feature of Kurth is this steel arch over the silos on its south side. The manholes in the floor open to the silos directly, and flimsy grates might catch a hurried worker. Grates were removable so that workers could descend into the concrete tubes, so a few are missing today.

Entrance to the Ford Mine

A long tunnel stretches toward the Mississippi. Was this the route Model Ts took on their way to waiting barges?

Dry House Door

Looking from the ‘crack’ that shows a collapsed tunnel into the dry house, in the direction miners returning home would walk. Note smoke lines above door.

19919 2-Ton

An auxiliary crane in the corner of the foundry room.

Narrow Gauge Turntable

A better look at the rails in the floor, installed to help move heavy equipment around the building.

Cables, Gangways, and Booms

The bottom of the tailings boom is rotten. In days when the dredge, floated, gangways connected it to shore, it seemed. You can see the size of the pontoons under the boat here.

Mine Cart Power Supports

The orange bars were secured to the tunnel walls to support electric lines for the mine carts. Lower parts of the sand mines were allowed to flood. The water was perfectly still, and made for a mud so thick it could suck off your boots.

Old Exterior Wall

This side of the mill, which abuts the Great Miami River, is much older than the other side of B Street. You can tell it went through many revisions.

Tworteen

A clicky-flippy clock is having some kind of malfunction.

Shiny Tracks

Twin tracks exit a concrete wall below St. Anthony (Cathedral) Hill.

Superior Elevator- Cupola

The cupola–the space above the silos–is surprisingly original. The building was too unstable for anyone to scrap it out. Seriously, the floor is a deathtrap.

Old Ward

Heavy wood doors for keeping people in.

Broken Dust Pipe

It seems like this pipe was made to return dust to the collector in the main workhouse from the annex.

Set the Pie on the Sill

In this ghost town where there were brick, wooden, and dirt-brick buildings, the latter fared the best by far.