machinery

Turbine Room

A few from atop the steam gauges along the western wall. The turbines were scrapped quickly after the plant closed, it seemed.

Evaporator Innards

Either the company was pulling parts from this evaporator to use as parts for other plants, or the last thing the workers did was to get this machine ready for the next campaign. Either way, plans changed.

Ball and Rod Mills

Tucked-into the side of the concentration mill… these machines were meant to crush underground rock into a fine dust for mineral extraction.

Buffing

A mid-line polishing booth. It was fun to see the thousands of lasers and other sensors that guided the robotic arms and tools around the bodies as they passed. Note the red/green stop/go lights in the distance.

Shutterchutes

At the end of a conveyor belt and poised over a loading station, it’s easy to image the tinny sound of chicken feed sliding across the metal. Like sand on the old-fashioned stainless steel playground slides.

Shaft No. 1 Hoisting Motor

One of the pair of motors that powered this mine shaft. In the 1950s, this shaft was designated a rescue shaft, and was only maintained for emergencies. One reason that Cheratte built Shaft 3 nearby was because these motors and infrastructure did not have the capacity that the giant mine below called for.

End of the LIne-(C)SUSBTREET.org

End of the paint line. After reading Father Action’s excellent-as-always writeup about his adventures here, I was pretty cautious around big spinning alarms. (See http://www.actionsquad.org/fordII1.html)

Looking Downward

I really like the porcelain guides for the silk threads, probably used because they could be polished for perfect, persistent, smoothness.

Scrapped Turbine Hall

The turbine hall, without turbines. I guess that makes this a hall… at least it has a clock.

MPE3- Port Arthur Ore Dock

Looking down at the Port Arthur Ore Dock from Manitoba Pool Elevator #3. The conveyor belts are gone and King Elevator is in the far distance.

The Big Blower

Too big to be scrapped, to simple to be auctioned. It waited for the demo crews and demo cranes to arrive.

BOMARC Launch Building

Inside a launch building you can see how the roof would split in the middle to allow the rocket to be raised into launch position.

Nordberg Hoist

The steam-powered hoist that pulled ore and dropped men from the mine. Note the hydraulic-operated brake on top with its massive brake pad. Now scrapped.

Floatation Floor

These machines circulated water through the powder from the ball mills. Gold and silver is heavier than gravel, so it sinks while the junk rock floats.

Conveyor Blower

Grain is taken from the bottom of the silos through a conveyor in a tunnel. These blowers keep the air in the tunnel fresh.

Crystalizer 4

The giant cog is missing on this machine, which turned a sugar slurry intro crystals. Green-blue stained glass makes the rusty machine glow in aquamarine.

Floatation Stairs

A side view of the floatation level. I found it interesting that there were little ladders and staircases in the mill to help workers get around–this place was not as shoddy as other mills I’ve seen.

Charge Car

I believe this is the push car, meaning it would push the charge in the oven out the opposite side into the train car.

Elevator Pulley

Scrappers tried to take this steel pulley out of Fisher, but it proved too heavy.

Row 56

These machines had embossed metal numbers marking their ends.

Filter

A filter to separate the sliced beets from boiling water.

Spare Parts II

Bits and things in a pile in the corner of the smelter, the unsold chunks of industrial history that didn’t sell at an on-site auction before my visit.

Incinerator Door Lock

In the back of the warehouse is the old incinerator, probably used to destroy kegs that could not be reused.

Autokiln Pipes

There are so many pipes i the factory–I wonder how many people knew where they all went, in the days these machines operated at capacity.

Dynamo

A closeup inside the mill’s power room.

Groud Floor

A better view of the belt system that drives all the machinery in the plant.

Webster & Elevator S

This sea leg was installed to unload grain boats. It’s pretty much a big bucket elevator that can be moved and lowered into waiting boats.

Barge Loader

Looking from the crane-motor catwalk into the Calumet. The arm shown here with the pulleys looped through it would have been lowered and the bucket conveyor in it would throw grain to waiting ships and boats bound for flour mills and foreign lands.

Rust-Shut Grain-Thrower

From the slip where grain boats would tie for loading and unloading, the unloader juts in a modernist-architectural way that is oddly visibly satisfying. Inside that white building is the retracted boat unloader, more or less a long and sturdy conveyor attached to a joint and crane motor. There used to be four loaders that looked like simple tubes with cranes and ropes attached hanging from this side of the elevator. All that remains of those is one fixture on the white building (not visible here) and the frame of one on the elevator proper, visible in the upper-middle of this image, to the right of the unloader apparatus.

Four Sisters Generator

One of the generators, weeks before it was taken apart to be shipped to another power plant somewhere else.

Fire Bucket

Fire buckets did not have flat bottoms so they could never be used for other buckety tasks, and were thus always handy in an actual fire.

Schmidt Brew Kettle

A brewmaster’s desk leans beside a long-disused stainless steel kettle. The staircase above goes to another level of kettles, which are visibly older.

Shadows of Taconite Harbor on the James R. Barker

As the Barker steamed past the dock and island, the sunset casts the shadow of the Taconite Harbor receiving trestle on the boat. Through the fog, you can see some of the islands that were joined into a breakwater.

James R. Barker III

Shadows of the rusty trestle and cold control towers on the Barker. Workers are preparing to swing over the sides of the boat to help secure her to the Minnesota Power dock.

Belt Thrower

A wounded flour mill, muscled into the corner to keep out of the way.

Roller Mill Pulley

The right-pointing crank adjusts the rollers inside of the mill. How fine do you want your flour?

Grain Feeds

I tried to hide the graffiti from my photos, but sometimes it wasn’t possible.

Quincey Flywheels

The generator room was state of the art when it was installed, allowing the complex to use motors and electric lighting ahead of its competitors.

Metal Sheer Cogs

A massive steel sheer’s equally massive drive cog. Imagine the force.

Spools

This picture typifies the industrial ideal of the early 20th century. More metal than air. More efficiency than beauty. More profits than people.

Cupula-less Rooftop

The mill is one of the tallest buildings in the city. It’s too bad that the cupola with its big skylights and flagpole were removed.

Grippers

Robotic pincers to move molten rods of glass between machines.

Diversion in the Shaft House

A hydraulic ‘bridge’ couple lower onto the tracks to bring mine cars into the shaft house, presumably for repair. I haven’t found this system anywhere else, but it makes a lot of sense.

MPE3- Conveyor Drives

A closeup of the pulleys atop Manitoba Pool #3 which once pulled conveyor belts full of grain across the cupola building as it was sorted into the silos below.

Radar Station

Light-painted to show off the beautiful radar equipment inside and Park Point across the bay.

Shop

The workshop sat below the main working floor and had serious power going to it.

Time Lost

Behind the main shaft is this familiar industrial sight… a running count of days since the last injury.

Slurry Ladder

A jankey ladder leads to a platform over a wooden tank. Here’s hoping my usage contributes to jankey being accepted into the dictionary! Thanks, lexicographers.

Rotten Dock

The top of the docks are so rotten in places that you can see the lake through the boards. In the foreground you can see the controls for the chutes, which work on a clutch.

Film- Fallen Blower

Part of the grain dust venting system, dislodged from its place above the dumping hatches under the grain cribs.

Conveyor Roofs

One of my favorite visual feature of grain elevators, especially big ones, is how they repeat.

Coating Section Conveyor

On the top floor of the former casket building is the finishing line for the coating section; on this section the final spray of plastic would hit the wood before a small furnace would seal the plastic permanently to the surface, making it more resilient, I assume.

Blast Furnace Six

Furnace #6; its catwalk and tapway. Note the lever-operated gutter-blockers.

Cadillac Coater

From inside a painting shed, where heatlamps and a vented roof made sure that the Caddy looked like it was worth the price tag.

MPE3- Tripper

Without a conveyor belt, this tripper seems lost. The job of this machine was simply to take grains from the moving conveyor belt and eject it into the silos via the chutes on the sides. Note all the dust collection venting added to the machine to suck up any explosive grain dust.

Franz-Engels-Straße

The coal extractor swings back and forth, ripping coal from the ground and throwing it on a conveyor belt to be burned a few miles away.

Killer Wheel

This mean-looking thing had a purpose, probably, but that function has been lost to decades of expansion.

Crushed Desk

When a big motor rusted free of its ceiling mount, it smashed onto this workbench.

From the Old Mill

This is part of the oldest section of factory, one that hasn’t had a roof in a long time and all usable equipment has been extracted. The machines pictured would spin sliced beets in boiling water… it was a sealed system before someone cut holes on sides of each unit.

Film- Globe Flywheel

Beautiful belt wheels above the grain cribs. Getting to the spot where this was taken is now impossible, and I don’t know whether these remain or not anymore.

Sea Leg Motor

The winch that hauled the sea leg, a decide to unload grain from waiting boats and barges.

Catwalks

The mill itself is one giant room sectioned into levels–more catwalks than concrete. Here you can see the evaporators and have a sense for the miles and miles of pipes that zigzag through the plant.

Kernel Crusher

When the building switched souls from booze to bread, these contraptions were mounted across the brewhouse floors… they’re not for hops, either.

Belden Fan

This belt-run axle ran a turbine (now gone) to blow fresh air into the mine.

Wood Wrought

A closeup of the old fashioned wood-and-iron flour mill, a little while before they were all scrapped.

Almond Joy

We know what the ladies’ favorite treats were! Found holding parts on a repair cart.

Copperless Dynamo

Looking through the center of a scrapped generator, its copper long scrapped.

Paint Line

The entry point for the painting shed on the top floor. Cars would have a few feet in between them before they entered. Separate sheds would prime and add color.

Flywheel

The white mark allowed for a manual RPM check on this big steel flywheel on the ground floor. Note how dark the bottom level of the mills is—that’s because all of the equipment is blocking out the light.

Cupola Closeup

The last batch of molded metal stuck in the chute, this metallurgical furnace was falling apart brick by disintegrating brick b the time I got to it. On the upper floors there is a sophisticated network of vents and chimneys to make these little furnaces as hot as possible.

Three Pulls to Freefall

The hoist signal dangling beside the modern mine shaft would ring a bell next to the giant electric motors that would send the men and machinery into the underground.

Tailings

The last tailings on a broken conveyor belt.

Ore Bucket on a Tram at Mayflower Mill

The aerial tram at the Mayflower Mill gives a sense of what the Gold Prince Mill in Animas Forks once looked like. Trams connected the mill to the mines around it without the need to negotiate trees, rivers, and rough terrain.

Ball Mills

Before the gold could be extracted, the rock was turned to powder. Depending on the size of the steel balls inside the mill, the rock would be reduced to a certain size. So, multiple mills were usually used in stages.

Carved: PAIGE

In the soft wood of the machine, an employee left their mark.

Air Compressor

There is a cool old air compressor in the corner of the powerhouse.

Unspooled

Empty spools, thousands of them, were around the mill.

Erector

The machine stood the Atlas missile up vertically over the blast pit, launching position, once the roof opened.

Colorful Night

At night the city lights blast through the broken windows, casting crazy colors through the off-white interior of the mill.

Water Wheel II

A staircase threads between the top floor and the sluices, which are in the middle of the dredge-mill.

Film: Gold Floatation

After crushing, these machines would float lighter material to the surface of the water, where it would be skimmed and discarded. Gold and silver laden stone would sink to the bottom, where it was collected for the next stage of processing. Leica/Summilux 35/Ektar 100

Furnace

This is a 1956 furnace. It was used to forge wheels, casings, and parts for the axel shop.

Rock Mill

The final ball mill in the Chain O’ Mines concentrator. Behind it was a bucket of steel balls.

Mill 43

Part of the 1917 mill that had a little bit of roof left over it–most of this building was open to the sky. The birds loved it, but everything metal was quickly becoming too unstable to walk on.

Government Press

A view of the government presses, with pages of law across the floor covered in footprints.

Pump Room

Next to the generator room is the pump room, which moved steam around the complex.

In the Trommel

Looking through the washer that is the first stop for the dredgings.

Mouthy

Open wide! Here comes the sugar beets!

Last Stamp Press

Away from the rest of the plant–as if forgotten, or hiding–is this little stamp press. Yes, this is little by press standards.

Hoists

The hoist room, before it was used for storage.

Slagbins at Sunrise

A morning shower made the plant’s metal siding shake… probably nothing, though, compared to when the furnaces were blasting. The objects on the ground are molten ore containers.

Fermenter Sixteen

Detail view of one of the fermenting tanks, still set-up for the distillery tours that no doubt took place when there last were such things. Nevertheless, the capacity of this tank multiplied across these all over the distillery floor really shows the power this company once had.

Aerial Monorail

I like to think of this as the hardware abstraction layer. It’s one of many subassembly monorail conveyors that dipped onto the factory floor to deliver assembled subsections where they needed to be on the main assembly floor below.

Peeling Pistons – (C)SUBSTREET

A wide view of the steam pump room, complete with pistons (taken apart for their brass), flywheels (covered in graffiti and rust) and pressure gauges (smashed apart for fun). I guess what I’m trying to say is, I was not disappointed.

Glowbug Dryer

An antique clothes dryer and sample inline 4 engine, the latter used as a training piece after WWII to retrain veterans.

Unravelled

The power pulley that ran air compressors straight off of the steam plant’s axel.

RotoGrate Technicolor

A colorful boiler is a happy boiler! RotoGrate systems remove ashes from the boiler firebox by revolving the bottom of the system to let the fly ash drop into a hopper. This greatly increases boiler efficiency.

Punched Pistons

Under the steam engine in the lower engine room–the camera is mounted right over the beginning of the cam shaft.

Dial-a-Winner

Patented in 1965 and produced by Specialized Mass Markets. User would insert token and use a rotary-phone-style dial to enter their token number. The machine would tally the numbers and indicate winners depending on the sum of said numbers. See USPTO US3455557.

Capacity

Much of the signage in the mill was hand-drawn.

Sifters with Manlift

On the upper floors where the sunlight is yellow–the color of flour dust, once exposed to the elements.

McConnell, MB (Kodak Tmax400 35mm)

One of the principal businesses in McConnell was a farm implement and lumber store. This is too new to have been bought there, but I like that it’s still on the edge of town. It’s more comfortable than the emptiness beyond, that used to be a little prairie town.

Tac Tripper

Taken from the arm of the pocket loader–note the tree growing out of the conveyor belt. Often where you see old piles of taconite, trees are springing up. The byproducts of the pelletization process break down and make a really fertile mix, especially with all the iron content!

Missile Arm (Fomapan 100)

The metallic arms of the missile erector, which would stand rockets over the blast pit in the launch position. Medium Format film–cheap but excellent Fomapan 100 in a Pentax 67.

Placer Pacer

The tailings boom is the first and last thing you see when approaching the mountaintop shipwreck.

Spinners

A closeup of one of the winding machines that found itself under a leaky section of roof.

Crystalizer 5

A line of huge machines wait to be used as parts under a long-disused belt drive.

Built 1860

Much of the milling equipment predated the mill itself, so I would not be surprised if this particular machine really dates to 1860.

Conveyor Bend

A sharp turn in the coatings department twists the steel out of sight.

Engine Room Arch

The powerhouse was notably older than the rest of the complex. I’m still not sure if it was build just for the cooperage, or whether it preceded it.

Big Pipe

A huge steam pipe snakes between catwalks, through the floors, and toward the condensers, so the water could be recovered and reused.

Tag 14, 1957

The left wall is stacked high with wooden crates holding spools. Tags hang on machines describing the last batch of silk the mill ever produced.

Poacher House

On the middle level of the Poacher House. For a detailed view of the chart see ‘See Reverse’.

Repair Cart

One of a few rolling workbenches to keep the thousands of pulleys, cogs, and belts working properly.

CALCULA-TOR

On my first self-guided tour, the calculator was caught my eye because it was one of the few things left behind in the laboratories that filled the second floor. On my next trip, it had been smashed to pieces.

Mine Level Indicator

The main shaft’s cable spooled with bird castings belies the fact that lives used to dangle from its steel-wound strength. Arrows on the circles would indicate the mine level the cars were currently at.

Port Sluice Room

Gold, which has a relatively high mass, would drop through the slats of the sluice boxes as the water flowed over them. Around the dredge were a half dozen radiator pipes to keep the water flowing through the machines.

Grinder

A sort of blender in a powder line building. The top vent had been removed, so leaves and light fall onto the teeth now.

Siftter Chutes

Before developers saw to cut and cut the flour mills inside Pillsbury, they stood at the ready beside various purposeful chutes the traversed the floors of between sorters. These machines were belt-driven by the power of Pillsbury’s Mississippi headraces and turbines, the force of which notoriously shook the building’s foundations themselves. The wheels would change the grade of the flour, or the size of the dust produced from crushing the kernels.

1957 Calendar

Park Insurance Agency is no longer in business, nor would you be able to dial that phone number.

Sluice Boxes and Kate

Kate for scale. Powder that passed the floatation level was flowed over sluice tables, another mass-based way of separating gold. I’ve never seen so many of these in one place. Though it was a hardrock mine, it worked more like a placer mine.

Tag 4-199, 1955

The batch tag specifies some of the technical properties of the silk worked here.

Heavy Times

The building in the foreground–the old control booth–was arsoned in 2009.

Vintage X-Ray

A vintage X-Ray machine in the oldest section of the hospital.

Cloverleaf Smelter Boilers

The boiler doors are beautiful, and feature the name of the smelter and mine company. If you like these, check my article on the Mitchell Yards of Hibbing, MN.

Direct Lightning Strike

This picture is lit by a direct lightning strike of the building. It’s impossible to describe the feeling of being in this giant open building the moment it channeled an electric explosion into the earth.

Old Kettles

In a strange loft next to the brewhouse are these twin kettles, which seem much older than the main kettles in the brewhouse.

Back of the Line

Note the large belt pulley in the center of the frame. Follow the axel it’s on and you’ll see several belts still attached to the drive, which was originally steam-driven.

Trommel

The first step of the filtering process is being spun through this tube.

One Out in Aluminum

Aluminum spools replaced their wooden counterparts, later in the factory’s history.

Ofen

One of the three ovens where the powder would be heater to over 2000 degrees… hot enough to fuse iron, but not hot enough to liquify it.

Caustic Pumps

Part of the brewing process is sterilizing the kettles, pipes and tanks all product would touch. This was done with a caustic solution. To the left is a healthy pile of asbestos where a heating tank used to stand, insulated in the carcinogenic mineral. The tank got cut apart, the asbestos stayed here.

Silk Thrower

The porcelain hoops guided the silk threads through the device.

Belt-Driven Mill

The flour mill’s interior is really just a system of steel and rubber tubes that crush flour over and over in the gap. This mill was never run off of water power directly, but it used to generate power using the river.

Reorder the Recorder

In one of the small offices there’s this machine that bills itself as “The Recorder.” I’m an old tech geek and I still don’t know what this really does.

Beet Cleaner

I am not sure what this machine does, but I have a hunch that it husks and cleans the sugar beets as they come into the plant. It is certainly the biggest single piece of equipment in any of the mills.

Boiler Room

Steam pipes snake up the walls like vines, but with asbestos.

Abriss einer Stadt

Looking down Pommenicher Straße from Gaststätte Rosarius, the monstrous machine about to devour the town bites at the ground.

Production Space

This is the building with the water tower on top, full of Barcol stuff that did not sell at auction and not worth the trouble to scrap.

Water Wheel I

This wheel scoops the washings from the sluice room and places it on the tailings conveyor.

Hot Metal Trench

The working end of the blast furnace, where molten metal would flow like lava out of the furnace… a process called ‘tapping’.

Asbestos Alley

This is the crane that would be used to lower extra-heavy bits of copper ore into the fire of the furnace.

Furnace Mouth

Copper poured from this furnace and was cast by the autocaster on the right into billets.

Above the Stacks

The middle section of the smokestacks were coal hoppers, and this device would load the coal into the hoppers from the conveyor belt it rode across. The bottom section of the stacks were storage rooms while the very top were, surprise, chimneys for the power plant.

North Face

Looking at the side of 4B from the roof of its car shed.

Spare Spools

The note on the left announces that the spindles in the crates are dirty.

Subassembly Line

These monorails were on a side line to build smaller parts of the Ranger before being attached to the truck itself. Note in the upper right that there’s another conveyor above this section.

Final Furnace

The end of the heating line allowed glass to cool slowly, and thus be stronger.

Hoist Room Panorama

On the left is the broken glass room that contains the controls for the cable spool, now gone, that sat in the metal shell on the right. The stairs led down to the hoisting engine itself. You can make out the slits where the cable ran up to the headframe tower through the gaping archway.

View from the Booth

It’s a straight view from the projection booth to the stage, but hell of a walk. At a fast pace, I think it would take 10 minutes to walk from this spot to the chair. Behind the curtains is a big white screen, so the theatre could be used for either stagework or moving pictures. The two projectors are set up for 3D movies right now–hence the little switch below the window–a Polaroid 3D synchronizer. Cool, huh?

Presses

Made by the Mergenthalen Linotype Company of New York, this model series (300) was introduced in 1960 and boasted a 12-line-per-minute reproduction rate.

Worthington Steam Engine

On the Turbine Room floor, one old steam pump still remains, ready to pressurize steam pipes with the hot stuff throughout the car shops and boilers.

Whoa! Over 200 pictures (211!) for this tag! Refresh the page for another random sampling.