mountains

Ogilvie’s Fez

When I first saw Ogilvie’s from the ground, I promised myself to look back when i found my way into this little pitched outcropping which seemed to have the best view of Thunder Bay I could imagine. It turns out, though, that there is no floor in that section; it is just extended machine access! Oh well. Mount McKay in the background in the last light.

Treasure Mountain Cabin

This building had the rusty remains of a few mattresses, likely used in the 1940s when this site was last occupied.

The Gold Prince Mill Ruins-(C)SUSBTREET.org

The Gold Prince is dead, but its ruins show how over-engineered it once was. Although its foundations were concrete, seen here, the rest of the mill was steel. All of its steel and equipment was removed to fix the Sunnyside Mill in Eureka.

Office Door

The substation has definite structural issues. Pictured is the sidewalk that connected the plant to the company housing.

Treasure Mountain Concentrator

The purpose of the concentrator was to separate the gold and silver-rich ore from the waste rock. You can tell from the design that the process relies heavily on gravity.

Silverton, Colorado

Taken as I drove out of Silverton, CO. One of my favorite landscapes of 2015. Want a print? Email me!

Mountain Sunrise

Early bird catches the shadow of Battle Mountain blaring across the ghost town.

Grocery Store

A panorama showing the biggest building in Gilman—unless you count the massive mine below as a structure.

Hiking Into Gilman

Hiking into the ghost town with enough gear to live there for a few days, if we wanted.

Gangway II

A screened water wheel, presumably for rotating the dredge once it lowered its “foot” to pivot in place.

Frontier Gas Station Sign

Frontier Gas is a former (?) gas station chain. Chain O’ mines reused a scrapped sign to mark their mill. Under the paint you can barely make out: GLORY HOLE GOLD MILL.

Gulchward

Looking through the loading platform of Frontenac Mine toward Black Hawk. In 1900, you would see Druid Mine on the left and Aduddell on the right.

The Duncan House in Animas Forks

William Duncan built this house for his family in 1879. It has become one of the most popular structures in the ghost town of Animas Forks.

La Crosse Tunnel Trams

The wood-braced structures descending the hill connected the La Crosse Tunnel to the mill in Central City. To see a picture of an aerial tram in action, see at my Treasure Mountain article.

Gangway I

A rusting disconnect gangway. The smokestack is for a boiler, if I recall.

Cerro Cochino

This peak is a little over 7,000 feet high and is a popular hiking spot. As a bulky Minnesotan who is better built for an arctic expedition, I stuck to the mesa.

Hike to Frontenac

The hiking around Central City is beautiful and full of history. Just get a proper topo map!

Cabezon Peak from Guadalupe Mesa

The valley is full of rocky peaks that stand out from the winding creeks, which only truly run after storms. It is a very beautiful place.

Mammoth Mine, Mammoth Hill

Mammoth Mine overlooks Central City from atop Mammoth Hill. In the distance you can make out Coeur d’Alene Mine (red), which operated from 1885 through 1940.

National Mine on Quartz Hill

National Mine and its rockhouse (?) as seen from Mammoth Hill. From this angle, I am fairly certain this was a crushing and sorting house. The bottom looks like it has two aerial tram doors as well.

Backdoor

Looking out at the abandoned neighborhood around the house.

Far Flung Locker

Workers’ lockers, strewn across Main Street, yet still out of the way.

Stickfence

Typical New Mexico ranch fencing. The power lines follow the rails between Springer and Wagon Mound.

The Animas River, near Mayflower Mill

Near Howardsville, Colorado, the Animas River gets quite wide. This is near the Little Nation Mill, which is worth a stop if you’re traveling north from SIlverton. It’s also near the former Gold King Mine, which “blew” in 2015 and flooded the Animas River with toxic mine water.

Gold Creek and the Old Concentrator

A creek has cut through the middle of the mine property, washing away the loose rock and eroding the foundations of the Concentrator. It’s pretty, though! It’s be belief, though I cannot prove it, that some of the water here originates from inside the now-buried Santiago Tunnel, which is no doubt flooded to a great extent.

Prize Mine Powder Vault

A safe distance from Prize Mine is its dynamite storage vault, designed to explode up–not out–should the worst happen.

Rain Over Cerro de Santa Clara

Soft rain on Vulcan’s ashy pyre… Both of these peaks are dead volcanos, too hard to be totally washed away by storms. As a result, they seem to rise dramatically from the flat valley.

Rock Crusher

These buildings were largely used as concentrators for the crushed rock, although I did spy some small mills inside these too.

Tailings Boom I

Like a railgun pointed at the Rockies… the boom would direct tailings–junk rock–outside of the dredge pond.

Gilman on the Cliff

The southernmost houses in Gilman are seen through the pines on the right, near the tram stop.

Bustling Animas Forks-(C)SUSBTREET.org

Looking out of one of the biggest houses in Animas Forks toward the rest of the residential district. It is hard to imagine the life the people here lived, for those that stayed the winter.

Eagle Mills

Looking across the whole milling operation from its dedicated powerhouse stretching across Eagle River.

Gold Collar Mine

Below Grand Army Mine is Gold Collar. A ‘collar’ is the braced section around the portal of a mine shaft.

Foot in the Door

A shuttered house at the end of the block doesn’t even have boards on it anymore.

Santiago Tunnel Tailings

Kate stands on top of the tailings pile that added some usable land to the side of the gulch. Somewhere nearby is the buried Santiago Tunnel.