murals

Boissevain, MB- Fujiroid

The side of the Boissevain Manitoba Pool elevator has a mural showing the equipment and inside the structure! Film: Fuji FP100C.

Stripper Stage

A humble stripper stage in the old NorShor lounge. The motif (back) highlights some of the area’s industries: shipping, mining, fishing, and taking your clothes off for tips.

Stage Right Motif

One of two circa-1941 nudes ‘medallions’ that adore the sides of the house. To the right is the proscenium and to the left is the backstage area.

Servir

Serve [unknown] Build… What do you think the middle says? Tell me in the comments.

House Lights, Please

Construction lights were still plugged in from the last inspection. Note the murals on the walls.

NorShor’s Main Stage

The house of the NorShor is surprisingly large, even divided in half. It seems unthinkable that this stage has been empty for so long.

Rockies Mural

Colorado, the most miningest state in the union, seems to be pictured in this lunchroom mural.

Mural

A depiction of historic Liège, known for its rivers and hills.

Turtle Panorama

A panorama from a basement room protected by an amphibian platoon, hand-painted by some National Guardsman from the past. I hope it gets preserved somehow…

Revised History

In this photo you see three lives of Lyric: 1.) The Art Deco murals showing the Vaudeville background; 2.) The suspended ceiling put in when the building was converted for film; 3.) The explorers, photographers and others who worked in and on the building before its final demolition.

Anon

Above the altar are faded murals. Here’s the Holy Grail.

Excellence Is Never Granted To Man But As The Reward Of Labor

Entrance to the plant. Hermes holds his iconic caduceus and a Model T. Demeter holds a tractor in a motif of wheat. A fantastic reimagining of the Greek, with an excerpt of the following quote by Sir Joshua Reynolds (18th century English painter): “Excellence is never granted to man but as the reward of labor. It argues no small strength of mind to persevere in habits of industry without the pleasure of perceiving those advances, which, like the hand of a clock, whilst they make hourly approaches to their point, yet proceed so slowly as to escape observation.”