numbers

Mockstock

Shelves in in the coloring department, where hundreds of different mixer lids are splashed with hardened glass dyes. Color thanks to a yellow-tinted skylight.

Curved Corridor, Exterior

These long curved corridors connected the wards. Locked doors on both of their ends were a security and comfort feature. Sounds and people would be sealed in their respective wards, as the hallways would act like beautiful airlocks; they were so long that it was unlikely that doors would be open on both sides at the same time. Portra 160.

Shoes

Leather shoes in a supply closet. They seem to me men’s shoes.

Mothballing by the Numbers

When the factory’s production line was up for auction, many parts were removed, crated and labeled with big painted numbers to ease their removal by buyers. Not everything sold, however, so not one dark corner of the factory seems without a pile of dislocated industrial junk.

Fisher Locker

#67, one of the only lockers that is not crunched to the point it refuses to open. In the corner of the small office area.

Gauges

In the grungy control room, I found a little slice that was never graffitied.

M2 – (C)SUBSTREET

The bricks routinely fell from the walls, like seeds falling from trees. On a smaller scale, new walls grew from the floors.

Doors 16 and 17

Pillars painted red indicated firefighting supplies. Fire was a very common enemy of early rail facilities, and many roundhouses burned down because of a combination of dry wood, hot, fire-breathing machinery and countless oil-saturated surfaces.

Transformer 509-4

A detailed look at the side of one of the thousands of transformer boxes in the war city.

Pool 8 Door

The end of the new elevator. Line of bird droppings follow the fire sprinkler pipes and wires in the room.

Bldg 253

This building seemed like a pump house or compressor house. It was full of empty concrete mounts.

Elevator Pulley

Scrappers tried to take this steel pulley out of Fisher, but it proved too heavy.

Bldg 100

Some sort of materials handling building, judging by the construction.

Room 1636

Many of the higher floors were more or less demolished–usually more. These would have been condos had ‘The Arcade’ project come to fruition. Now there are simply wide open floors punctuated only by pillars and meaningless hallways.

Brick Graffiti- 46

The corners of these buildings are inscribed by a century of bored rail workers and delivery drivers. Pictured is the southeast corner of the Twohy, which is typical of mercantiles.

Fifteen Tons by Whiting

The old crane swung on windier days over the Worthington Steam Pump. This is probably last used to disassemble the antique generators, which are all now gone.

Tag 14, 1957

The left wall is stacked high with wooden crates holding spools. Tags hang on machines describing the last batch of silk the mill ever produced.

Chair Doe

Hard to find your seat when it doesn’t know its own name.

Storage Bunker

North of the assembly complex is a storage network of earthen and concrete bunkers.

Sunset Behind Dock

The ice reflects the blue sky on the rust. The sunset blasts through the concrete pillars holding it all up.

Backdoor

Gary Methodist was a filmset for Transformers 3 in 2010.

Workshop and Parts

The workshop and parts room was full of light and meticulously sorted bolts, nuts, washers, gaskets, and all sorts of specialty hardware.

Bids

A bank of vertical filing cabinets, probably dating to National Guard days.

Gas Pump

Between the gauges for the power plant boilers and the steam pump flywheels.

Capacity

Much of the signage in the mill was hand-drawn.

362

The texture of the cracking poured concrete ore pocket is somewhere between stone and driftwood.

Fans

Beside the shaft building are two fans on skids, indicating they were used underground.

Agitator 233

The top floor of the nitrating house was full of switches and breakers for the operation below, each bearing a label and number. Nowadays everything is printed, but when INAAP was built, all these signs were painted by hand.

Levels

A 8-foot-tall volume indicator that could be read from across the beet boiler floor–convenient when the controls are 20 feet away.

Counterweighted Antenna

Presumably, in a nuclear blast the antenna would be blown flat and pop back up, allowing communication even after a near-direct hit.

7 1-2

Scrawls on the side of the beams of the ‘Pipe Shop;.

Chute A-6

Atop Elevator ‘M’, formerly Cargill ‘O’.

Siftter Chutes

Before developers saw to cut and cut the flour mills inside Pillsbury, they stood at the ready beside various purposeful chutes the traversed the floors of between sorters. These machines were belt-driven by the power of Pillsbury’s Mississippi headraces and turbines, the force of which notoriously shook the building’s foundations themselves. The wheels would change the grade of the flour, or the size of the dust produced from crushing the kernels.

35 Ton Crane

A wimpy crane by most standards, only suitable for moving around parts of steam turbines.

Cone Room

The scale of the grain hoppers helps tell the story of how large Hamm’s was in its day.

354

Looking across the catwalk behind the ore chutes, when they were up, and at the top of the ore chutes during loading.

Manlift, Top Floor

A reminder to the manlift riders to get off the belt before they hit their heads on the ceiling. This is the top level of the headhouse, where dust collectors would extract most of the grain bits from the air to reduce risk of explosion.

Paint Shop

Different doors for different vehicles, I would guess. White Pine Mine used tire-based vehicles, rather than track-based, making it pretty different than other mines I’ve been to.

One Ear

Standing between pockets 1 and 2. You brought hearing protection, right?

Announcments

A primitive intercom system connected the various wards to their respective nurse’s stations. They looked hand-made and likely originated, in part, in the FFSH carpentry shop. They were often placed high, like this one, to be out of patient reach.

Tworteen

A clicky-flippy clock is having some kind of malfunction.

Room #486, Criminal Ward

In the ward for the criminally insane, this door was the most-worn. Nail scratches mark the area around the peep hole, the wood is gouged everywhere from thrown chairs and hard kicks, and a ominous blood-colored stain is visible where it dripped in the second inset from the bottom. Aside from the damage, the coloring in this section was very vibrant, though it was probably little reprieve for those who had to work here.

2000 CCs

Jars like these were used to measure the volume of fluid pumped out of TB patients’ lungs.

Door for Room 460

In the nurses’ dormitories, beds, couches and chairs still sit. It’s unclear whether these are remnants of the homeless shelter in the 80s or the actual nurses.

Pillar 120

Every timber pillar was numbered for maintenance purposes.

Old Ward Room #217

Part of the unremodeled hospital, above the Service Building, where employees would stay sometimes.

Dear Delivery People

Miscellaneous math and strange instructions remain all across the shipment section walls. Sadly, this section likely fell into disrepair before the others.

Block Glass Blues

Watching the comings and goings of doctors, nurses and new patients was a mainstay of asylum routine; one can find it easy to imagine pale faces pressed against the block glass windows, staring out at the world moving past them.

Film: Juice Levels

Thick glass windows allow workers to check the beet juice levels in this steel tank. You can tell by the reinforcement that it had a lot of liquid and had to hold against immense pressure. Kodak Tri-X 400/Leica M7.

Enough to Hang By

Asbestos rope isn’t something you can buy at Home Depot anymore, but it’s fire and heat resistant stuff; great for industrial work, like in a sugar mill.

Coke Oven Doors 64-66

The individual ovens are skinny to allow even and fast heating of the whole interior. Numbers are cut into signs because no paint could withstand the heat or corrosive emissions from the coking process.

1957 Calendar

Park Insurance Agency is no longer in business, nor would you be able to dial that phone number.

Dock 5L

One of the covered rail loading docks. All of them were overgrown and rust-clad.

Film: Gold Floatation

After crushing, these machines would float lighter material to the surface of the water, where it would be skimmed and discarded. Gold and silver laden stone would sink to the bottom, where it was collected for the next stage of processing. Leica/Summilux 35/Ektar 100

Port Sluice Sprays

Sprays of water kept the muddy mixture flowing across the sluices, which filtered out gold particles from gravel and dirty.

Tag Room

Thousands of tags in a supply closet. Each has lots its meaning.

Firing Range II

Looking down range. You can tell where most of the rounds hit by the dark marks in the wall.

Built 1860

Much of the milling equipment predated the mill itself, so I would not be surprised if this particular machine really dates to 1860.

Anti-Jumber Stairs

Some of the internal staircases were fitted with cages that wound round down the stairs to deter suicidal patients from taking a dive.

Wort Cooler Silhouette

My favorite time to be in the brewery was sunrise. That’s the kind of light that made the brewhouse glow.

Row 56

These machines had embossed metal numbers marking their ends.

Power Plant

An old stoker in a power plant that was abandoned long before the mill next to it, by all indications. Sugar mills burned dry beet pulp pellets for fuel.

MPE3- Score Board

Peering into a remote office at Manitoba Wheat Pool #3. Someone left their to-do list behind.

Chute Fourteen

On first impression it might look like a funky mailbox, but trust me on this one; it’s a flour bolter chute. In flour milling, “bolting” means sifting the flour through successively smaller screens.

Mill 43

Part of the 1917 mill that had a little bit of roof left over it–most of this building was open to the sky. The birds loved it, but everything metal was quickly becoming too unstable to walk on.

Strike Prices

A whiteboard in the quiet turbine room lays it all out… you should sell.

Department Sign

I found a historical photo of this room showing 10-foot high machines with wires hanging by the mile from looms and schematic charts.

Building 402

Unloading boats had the option to take on fuel at Taconite Harbor. This building, among other things, pumped fuel to the dock.

Flanges

Sugar mills have endless numbers of pipes, washers, seals, and flanges to connect all of the equipment. This is where the spare parts were all stored by size and rating.

Dominion- Cracked Skylight

The roof of the elevator was partly lit naturally with six big skylights. The less electricity pumped into a grain elevator, the less chance of a grain dust explosion.

Foggy 51

The cold air collided with the sun-warmed water on the floor, filling the ground floor of the Keg House with thick fog…

Row 189

This machine was last overhauled in February 1955, and last turned out Crepe silk, probably dress material.

Campaign Tracker

A handmade sign tracks the progress through the current beet campaign. For this factory, it was about 30 years ago. Perhaps the idea was to pit shifts against each other.

Bucket Lift

With the maintenance door open you can see the buckets on in the vertical conveyor.

Argo Tunnel, 2015

Looking into the Argo Tunnel at its Idaho Springs portal. I was hoping to see tracks and a steel door, but found a busy crew of environmental workers installing a pipe between the bulkhead and new water plant.

Backordered

A shipment board for customers that may or may not exist anymore. Let’s assume any of the products made here are probably on backorder.

Brick Graffiti – 1933

Fantastic brick graffiti piece by a Duluthian in 1933! Is the stick drawing of a horse? Feel free to weigh in.

Production Floor Clock

No wonder the factory shut down; everyone was scheduled to work 9 to 5 and the clock’s broken! (In all seriousness, this is/used to be a beautiful timepiece, especially for a utilitarian factory like this.

Haus, Anno 1815

This building was 99 years old when it was demolished for the coal mine.

Collector 4

Pipes to channel nitrose (think nitro glycerine) infused acid through the building.

Door 8

The curving corridors flanking the Administration Tower are especially ornate, though the prison-like door betrays the real purpose of the building.

Furnace 59

The ’59’ is just a reference to that work station. Unfortunately the scrappers beat me to this machine–there was not much left besides the 2-ton shell and this control panel.

Bldg 106

This building looked like some sort of office.

Milwaukee Road E70 (Ektar 120)

An engine on display outside the Montana Territorial Prison in Deer Lodge, MT. This was a typical electric locomotive used by The Milwaukee Road.

Fermenter Sixteen

Detail view of one of the fermenting tanks, still set-up for the distillery tours that no doubt took place when there last were such things. Nevertheless, the capacity of this tank multiplied across these all over the distillery floor really shows the power this company once had.

101-B

An original stencil-brushed sign.

Conveyor 13

One of thousands in the complex. Part of a series of photographs where I capture the number “13” in industrial settings.

Sinterband 3

The control room for the whole of the plant. Sinterband here means one of the sintering lines. Temperatures, gasses, mixtures, speeds, and so on were centrally controlled here.

Stoker Notes

In front of a rust-welded Illinois rotary stoker is where the boiler-men made their mark. The last year I can make out is 1985.

No Smoking, Wooden Sign

Allouez had already suffered one major fire. It didn’t need another–especially under Dock 1’s wooden approach.

197

In the mine offices, hooks and a board with numbers was the system to keep track of who was in the mine and who was safe.