shacks

Drain to Scale

Molten copper pouring being a very dangerous thing to do by hand, this scale measured the load for the “Auto Caster” that actually formed the cooling copper in its molds.

Mountain Sunrise

Early bird catches the shadow of Battle Mountain blaring across the ghost town.

Thunder Bay Elevator

Thunder Bay Elevator, now stands without a headhouse. Around the silos, a few shacks still stand.

Dock Shack I

Originally, this part of the dock was reserved for the weather station.

Sequence

The side of a launcher, with outbuildings in the background. You can see the tracks where the roof would open before launch.

Radome Guard Shack

Part of the decommissioned plant was used by the Air Force for virtual bombing runs. This is the guard shack for the radar station.

Isabella, MB- Service at Cost

Inside the office was a small furnace and a collection of mechanical belts. You can see “SERVICE AT COST” and “POOL 168” in the background.

Dock Shack II

The turned rail was to prevent runaway cars from going over the end of the dock and into the lake.

Cracked Lake Superior

As wind and currents moved the ice around between the ore docks, the sounds of crunching echoed through the otherwise quiet bar.

Frontier Gas Station Sign

Frontier Gas is a former (?) gas station chain. Chain O’ mines reused a scrapped sign to mark their mill. Under the paint you can barely make out: GLORY HOLE GOLD MILL.

Hollow Below

While it looks like ground level, everything here is one story above the actual earth.

Missile Base Gate

If it wasn’t for the humming and crackling of the wires, I could believe I had arrived to a post apocalyptic landscape.

Dock 2 at Sunset

Winter skies over Allouez Bay. From a distance, it looks almost fragile.

Elements in the Dark

The shed in the front was full of worker supplies–namely goggles and heavy leather gloves. Molten copper isn’t a friendly thing to handle.

Biking Past Bunkers

Because of the dangers of storing the materials to make explosives as well as the explosives themselves, there were earthen bunkers all across the plant like this.

Railroad Depot

A squat building with a rail scale. Taken between rain showers in late summer, when I seemed to be the only one at White Pine.

Dryhouse

A stencil instructs the first and third shifts to ask security for access. Security was out during all my visits, except one mishap where a strung-out local chased me with a truck. Having spent a decade exploring the U.P., I was not caught off guard.

Miner’s Outhouse-(C)SUSBTREET.org

I’m not sure, actually, whether this was an outhouse (right), but it seems likely. In any case, it was connected by a covered staircase to the Bunk House (left). The soil here was not all tailings, so there is a bit of thick grass–almost the only in sight!

Main Gate

The main gate, as seen in 2005. It hasn’t changed much since then.

Office

The office for the maintenance shop was sound-insulated and ventilated.

Driveway

This old Jetta did more offroading than your average lifted tinted loud-exhaust pickup.

Outbuildings

Outbuildings near the perimeter fence. Beyond is all ranch land.

Rotten Dock

The top of the docks are so rotten in places that you can see the lake through the boards. In the foreground you can see the controls for the chutes, which work on a clutch.

Oberon, MB

The iconic outline of a prairie sentinel. Quintessential rural industrial architecture.

Outbuilding (Fomapan 100)

Looking through a launcher doorway at an outbuilding… the fire truck garage, if I recall correctly. Fomapan medium format in Pentax 67.

Treasure Mountain Cabin

This building had the rusty remains of a few mattresses, likely used in the 1940s when this site was last occupied.