stonework

Holmfield, MB- Harrison Mill

The Harrison flour mill, completed in 1897 and expanded in 1901 and 1902. The tunnel that I am standing on probably transported grain from the elevator to the mill. Medium Format.

The Shortened Temple

The top three floors were removed from the top of the Temple Opera Block (right). If you have a sharp eye, you can see the outlines of some of the old floors on the shared wall of the Orpheum (left). For a time, the front of the building held a bus stop.

Cave Brewery Entrance

In the far back of the cellars there are some old bottles. This arch shows an old entrance to the cellars, now collapsed.

Banksy Ripoff

At this junction where Brewery Creek gets a breath of fresh air stands a kid holding a paintbrush: a Banksy (famous graffiti artist) ripoff.

Religious Row

The pigeons and raccoons have no use for these, so they will sit empty until snow or fire removes them by force.

Spring House

This natural spring was the inspiration for the distillery that grew around it.

Twohy Shield

One of the flashier details on the front of the Twohy Mercantile Building.

River Valley Caving

Mark poses for scale in the natural section of the cave. It appears to have been created by erosion, where water following the natural fault (crack above) washed the sandstone below away, thereby creating a dead space. The stone doorway appeared to be original.

East End Drain

An outfall for 43rd Avenue Creek. Let’s rename it Substreet Creek; isn’t that a better name?

Distillery Door

The back door into the old distillery building. Not castle-like at all, sadly.

Chester Creek Infall

Chester Creek Infall, near Duluth’s old Armory. The creek will not emerge again until it is near the Lakewalk.

Pillsbury A’s Stone Fascade

From Main Street, looking straight up at the A Mill, only the silence makes one think that nobody’s still inside, grinding grain into Pillsbury’s Best.

Hexagon Building

This battlement-like tower is the first thing one sees coming to Old Taylor from Frankfort.

Pillsbury Tailrace

The mill was powered, in part, by water flowing through turbines under it. After the flow worked the industrial heart of the flour mill, it was exit to the Mississippi here.

Kegmaster’s Causeway

A mix of brick and stone construction where the stock house meets the cellars. The caves brought well water to the brewery and drained the refuse away, and the various sewer connections are visible here and tell the story of the company’s expansion above.

Roof Door

When I moved from the roof back into the upper floors of the distillery, the plants growing out of the masonry caught my eye. It’s 60 feet up, but looks like it could be an old wall.

Old Crow Face

The front of the power plant (right), the distillery itself (center), and the regaling house (left).

Arsoned Building, 2005

Shortly after the former delivery wagon shed was arsoned in 2005. A turning point in the story of Hamms’ abandonment.

Cabezon Peak from Guadalupe Mesa

The valley is full of rocky peaks that stand out from the winding creeks, which only truly run after storms. It is a very beautiful place.

Turbine Bottom

Part of the Pillsbury tunnel that brought water back to the Mississippi River.

Kentucky Castle

Zachary Taylor’s very own Scottish castle, spring-side in the Kentucky backcountry. Boarded and waiting, but in surprisingly good condition, considering the decades. I especially love the tower on the right side of the frame.

Prize Mine Sign

The mine was built with stone, wood, and steel. It’s in good condition.

Cerro Cochino

This peak is a little over 7,000 feet high and is a popular hiking spot. As a bulky Minnesotan who is better built for an arctic expedition, I stuck to the mesa.

Tunnel Cart

A light-painted portrait of one of the few remaining carts that moved everything from fresh eggs to soiled laundry through the tunnels.