windows

Buckstaff Windows

The side of the oldest building on the property, the former casket factory.

Behind the Blue Door

In the middle of one of the outlying cottages, perhaps the Masonic Cottage–it was too damaged to tell, really–are these pair of skinny doors that led from patient rooms to a common area with rotting shag carpet.

The Long Mill

Tarpaper telling time-
Wood wittling weather-
Rust rot ruins.

Ringling Depot – Door

Stairs and power lines enter the abandoned depot. Shingles slide off the rotten roof. Ektar 100/Mamiya 6

Erekt

The buildings were level with one another, so one could look through as many as a dozen factory floors from one window.

Gangway II

A screened water wheel, presumably for rotating the dredge once it lowered its “foot” to pivot in place.

Mine Cart Shop

In this old repair shop, vines fall from the rotting roof to meet mossy concrete. Even though it had been dry for days, water dripped in from the roof to make permanent puddles between workstations. It was full of color and sound and industry and nature.

Fancy Trim

This room’s trim was unlike the others. Perhaps it was for a live in supervisor.

Thunderdumpers

These dump cars moved copper ore to the top of the furnaces… it’s about two stories above ground level.

Sisters’ Chapel

This roof hasn’t budged under the weight of snow, instead it just filters-through the light onto the floor.

By Pass Stokerside

A control panel that was mothballed, anticipating a time when the plant may be reactivated.

Ugly Archway

Part of the Laundry Building with an ugly archway between rooms. Note that even this building had a nurse’s station with shatterproof windows. Laundry was done by supervised patients as part of their Occupational Therapy and the staff took no chances.

Industrial Stained Glass

Different colors stained the small panes on the top floor. For once, it seemed more ridiculous to not be inside an abandoned factory.

Machine Shop and Dry House

These were some of the most attractive shops of all the mines in the area. It’s no wonder Hanna Mining wanted to use them as their center of operations in the Iron River district.

A Certain Industrial Elegance – (C)SUBSTREET

This is one of my favorite doorways (yes, I have favorites) for a few reasons: 1.) You can see how the once-arched door has been squared-off for rectangular doors to fit; 2.) you can see one complete historic door and one ruined door, and the chain that used to hold them together before someone kicked-out the security, and; 3.) I like the texture of the bricks and design of the radiators in the room beyond–the blacksmith shop. Just do.

Brick Arches

The arches of the Twohy building, before some of the signs and sills were painted in 2015.

Front of the Adler

The trees were so overgrown, it was difficult to see the hotel at all from the road.

Buckstaff Back

This is what the complex looks like today to the bare eye. Dull, monochrome, quiet.

Jackson Residence

“Paint the fence,” they said, but I don’t feel like it… who cares, anyway.

Safety Staircase

The fences helped discourage patients from throwing themselves down the stairs.

Workshop

Much of the circa-1950s buildings remain with few alterations, such as these long boring sheet metal ruststicks.

Barcol Vignette

Grimy windows and the other half of the complex trade interests and stares.

Gantry Crane Control

A long exposure in the crane cab at sunset throws a bit of color into the bleak yellow glows between the windows and car shaker.

Tumbleweed Catcher

Sheet metal over the windows. A red boot sole in the tumbleweeds. Is it inside, or outside?

9am in the Mine Shops

Algae grows where water flows/From the sawtooth roof/To the mines below/The sun climbs high/But is in no one’s eyes/A wall alone crumbles/It was no suprise

Four Sisters Generator

One of the generators, weeks before it was taken apart to be shipped to another power plant somewhere else.

Replaced Planes

This building was responsible for storing and drying the barrels. Compare right.

Bottom of the Spiral

Connecting the Administration building’s tower and top floors is this beautiful cast iron staircase. It was probably designed to help service the clock originally planned to be set in the tower, but when the hospital went over budget the state cancelled the timepiece. Now we are left with a gorgeous stair with little or no real purpose–not that I’m complaining. I am a long-admitted spiral staircase fetishist.

Shaft No. 1 Hoisting Motor

One of the pair of motors that powered this mine shaft. In the 1950s, this shaft was designated a rescue shaft, and was only maintained for emergencies. One reason that Cheratte built Shaft 3 nearby was because these motors and infrastructure did not have the capacity that the giant mine below called for.

War City Power

From the bottom of the skyway I looked back, my eyes tracing the vines from the marsh up the smokestacks to the perfect Midwestern sky.

Some Assembly Required

One of my favorite shots from that year, conveyor line parts stacked and hung with Postal Service bins from decades ago.

Cockpit

One of two control towers that reached over the lake. The control panel here was used to move the conveyors over the ship’s hold doors, adjust flow of the taconite, and so on.

Old Boiler Room

The old boilers of the steam plant have been mostly gutted to remove loose asbestos.

Sunset Through Factory Panes

It’s almost hard to tell whether the colors come from oil in the water or the colorful glass lit up by the Michigan sunset.

Entrance to BOM

Above my head while taking this picture was the seal of the Department of the Interior.

Brach’s Headquarters

The office building was fancy compared to the utilitarian factory behind it. My favorite part was the logo crown.

Registration

The service window in the Administration Tower had seen some abuse, even if it wasn’t so old.

Pillsbury A’s Stone Fascade

From Main Street, looking straight up at the A Mill, only the silence makes one think that nobody’s still inside, grinding grain into Pillsbury’s Best.

Old Crow Face

The front of the power plant (right), the distillery itself (center), and the regaling house (left).

Hookup

The power gauge showed… broken.

Down the Boom

Through a section of the tailings boom where mountain winds tore open the sheet metal around the conveyor, I poked my head out.

Dump One

Some of the rotting clothes were in boxes, split long ago from moisture. Others were just heaped in piles.

Sewing Room Stairs

These stairs connected some small main-level offices with one of the main sewing rooms above. Because the roof on this building was strong, it was pretty well preserved–look at those colors. Through the open fire door on the left, though, you can see that the roof has given out.

Fisher Penthouse

Above the offices is this little section of factory that still has strips of wood flooring. This may be where the upholstery was cut.

Coke Batter B Control

The view from the larry, looking out at the overgrowing coke oven top. Papers listed the order of the charges for each oven, noting the sticky doors and persistent leaks. Emergency respirators and rescue gear was stored close, as long exposure to emissions from the rusty hatches could make worker pass out on the top of the ovens.

Fans

Beside the shaft building are two fans on skids, indicating they were used underground.

Stair Landing

The gothic landing between balcony and classroom level and the ground floor.

Dust Funnels

Dust explosions were a real risk for grain mills. These funnels helped to filter the air in the mill.

Bldg 106

This building looked like some sort of office.

MPE3- Score Board

Peering into a remote office at Manitoba Wheat Pool #3. Someone left their to-do list behind.

Bricked Windows

Windows provided the 250-some workers with fresh air and light, and helped to keep flour dust from building up in the air, helping to prevent explosions. Today, machines control air flow better without windows, so they were bricked.

Boiler Room

Steam pipes snake up the walls like vines, but with asbestos.

Powerlines

The power lines follow the street, down to the mineshaft. Everything revolved around the mine, it seemed.

Convex Selfie

The north side of the plant is modern 60s industrial architecture, meaning massive open spaces with no personality. This mirror is the most interesting thing I could find.

SWP4- From the Annex (Arista 100)

One of my favorite shots of the headhouse at the Saskatchewan Wheat Pool #4, with one seagull threading the needle. The socket holes on the frame got blown out thanks to my bad developing, but I like the effect. Arista 100.

Sunrooms

The Sun Rooms, or Common Rooms, reminded me of the Panopitcon turned inside-out.

Bridge to Buckstaff Factory

This wide skyway connected two of the inner factory buildings, where parts would have to be transported to keep the operation moving, which is why it is much wider than other bridges in the plant.

Saturation Controls

In the modern control room at the base of the white elevator tower are the electronics that ran the newer building, its rail components and boat-loading component. The superstructure permeates all spaces here, as can be seen with the crossing I-beams in the main office.

Crating Building

The building on the right was where parts not assembled onto vehicles would be set in crates for shipment.

Furniture Party

As if they were planning to move the furniture out of the hospital, it all sits in the main hallway in the ground floor.

Second Floor Throwers

Standing atop the dust collector, the factory breaks down into diverging patterns, processes.

Dylan Stage

The roof has been replaced since this was taken. Hopefully, that will stem the water damage.

Fort Liege Sign

A sign facing the city on an exterior wall–a sort of motivational poster.

Sign Language

Looking at the boarded exterior of the newer area of the orphanage from its 1914 section.

Man Behind the Window

The man behind the curtain watches, but doesn’t say anything. Probably the smartest one in the room.

James R. Barker I

The Barker turning around before it backed into Tac Harbor to unload coal for Minnesota Power.

Many Windowed Building

Between two brick buildings is a metal one with many windows set into it. Having been in many mills of similar design, I conjecture that this was the milling building, where machines ground the corn before it was boiled.

Building 10

I like this picture because it shows some of the only unbroken windows at Packard.

The Adler

The old hotel doesn’t like to show its age. Indeed, if it had a few paint job and soft remodel it would be fit to open–that is, if there was a need for it in this tiny rural New York town.

Film: Pozo Mine

Pozo Mine, the most menacing mine building I’ve ever seen. Black and white film, shot with the Fuji GX680, a beast of a camera.

Wood Block Floor

A steel powder keg serves as a door prop on the static-proof wood core floor. Note the ‘XXX’ marking to the left of the double door.

Company House

There were a few large houses on the Old Crow property where employees would live. The glen had little housing.

Please Close Windows

Wind blew taconite dust against the walls of these suspended control room, making even the glass appear to rust.

Cracked Wall

I really like the way this high-ceilinged room is decaying. Well, decayed. It’s demolished now.

Looking Out A Window at the Starch Works

The layout and design of the buildings reminded me strongly of a brewery or distillery. To the right you can see some of the retrofits by the first lumber company to buy the buildings, in the 1970s.

Twin Room

In an old ward, two men would have shared this room.

Common Room

A circular common room in one of the original parts of the hospital. When the asylum was especially crowded, this would be filled with patient beds, too. It’s very strange that this floor was not tiled like the other common rooms. It makes me wonder if especially dangerous patients were kept in this ward; those who could not be trusted to not extract and sharpen the ceramic tiles. Portra 160.

Everybody is a Star

The topmost roof of the hospital is covered in antennae and includes a star that faced the rest of the complex, now demolished.

Block Glass Blues

Watching the comings and goings of doctors, nurses and new patients was a mainstay of asylum routine; one can find it easy to imagine pale faces pressed against the block glass windows, staring out at the world moving past them.

Top Floor Tunnel Door

In most places, it may seem off for there to be a tunnel door on the top floor of a building, but Ford was that kind of place. This door from the steam plant led into a skyway and tunnel that connected to the main assembly floor.

Observation

An observation room, possibly for children, has drapes around a 2-way mirror. You know, to dress up the fact that someone could be watching anonymously on the other side.

Studebaker in HDR

At sunset the light skips from puddle to stagnant puddle across the whole foundry room, playing with the classic sawtooth roof with half-hearted shadows.

A Single Room

This is one of the more private rooms in the old section of the hospital. It likely only accommodated one patient.

Plant Office

In the middle of the foundry, an office is untouched by scrappers, legal and not. Inside, warnings and catalogs for machines that are gone, obsolete, and melted down.

Headquarters in Fog

The headquarters for the plant was in the middle of it. It’s abandoned but well preserved–a strange sight in Gary, Indiana.

Kurth Malting- Cupola Arch

The sexiest feature of Kurth is this steel arch over the silos on its south side. The manholes in the floor open to the silos directly, and flimsy grates might catch a hurried worker. Grates were removable so that workers could descend into the concrete tubes, so a few are missing today.

Courtyard Door

A side door on the rear of the castle that let guests out into a small stone courtyard below a tall turret.

Hoist House Crane Shaft

Looking past the hoist room (left) toward Shaft No. 1, behind the concrete head frame built in the late 1940s. This shaft could haul equipment from ground level (below) to shop level, where the picture was taken.

Curtains

This little curled yellow thing is one of the last hints that this adobe building was lived in.

Ratimis – Brahm

The four buildings seen here comprise almost all of the notable remaining structures.

Peeling Stair I

One of the few windows that escaped steel plating the last time the hospital was sealed tight to let nature roam within.

Fourth Floor Room

On the top floor of one of the old wards, the slanted roofline makes the this group room more claustrophobic. Portra 160.

Star Landing

A white star marks the landing between the Keeper’s Quarters (Second Floor) and the radiobeacon and furnace rooms (First Floor).

headFrame of Mind

This is a great example of a combination rock house; the silos below used to fill trains with ore dropped from mine cars pulled to the top of the structure.

Grand Staircase

The grand staircase with little balconies leaning over it. All the stone stairs are broken and graffiti marks every wall.

Gilman Labs

The company labs. If you can believe it, this area is even more destroyed today.

Skylights

Noontime light, long criticized for the boring shadows it grants photographers, comes into its own sometimes.

Gothic Yellow

Taken while standing on the torn outline of a scrapped altar. With my back to the faded outlines of men, books and the Holy Grail, the room seems much lighter.

Water Tower

In the distance, the San Haven Sanatorium water tower.

Curved Corridor, Exterior

These long curved corridors connected the wards. Locked doors on both of their ends were a security and comfort feature. Sounds and people would be sealed in their respective wards, as the hallways would act like beautiful airlocks; they were so long that it was unlikely that doors would be open on both sides at the same time. Portra 160.

Ampersand

In what Studebaker called the ‘Materials Building’ are these giant concrete bins of fine molding sand, there for casting metal parts using the molten metal from the adjoining building. On the far left side there is a train track and once upon a time a gantry crane traced the room under the roof

Gangway I

A rusting disconnect gangway. The smokestack is for a boiler, if I recall.

Headframe Eyes

Imagine with yellow window guards are eyebrows and the open windows are the eyes. This headframe seems a bit curious.

Worthington Steam Engine

On the Turbine Room floor, one old steam pump still remains, ready to pressurize steam pipes with the hot stuff throughout the car shops and boilers.

Sacred Heart Sunroom

Fluorescent lights peel back from the walls like caterpillars, rearing up and away from the glare of the sunflower-fans.

Powerhouse

The powerhouse had two elevated tracks behind it, one for coal and one for deliveries.

Dan by the Boiler Room

In the power house corner is this gratuitously gigantic doorway. It used to be even bigger, too, as indicated by the brick arch another foot over the top windows.

Water Wheel II

A staircase threads between the top floor and the sluices, which are in the middle of the dredge-mill.

Microphone

A familiar scene in Control Tower B, though the microphone has not been used for years.

Train Bay

This bay would host boxcars as workers would fill them with the fruits of the factory.

Common Window

Looking into a common from the grounds. The block glass makes the interior seem dreamlike and distorted. Note the poor condition of the bricks around the window.

Bed Rest

Judging by the bed, this room was used by employees in its later years.

Film: Gold Floatation

After crushing, these machines would float lighter material to the surface of the water, where it would be skimmed and discarded. Gold and silver laden stone would sink to the bottom, where it was collected for the next stage of processing. Leica/Summilux 35/Ektar 100

North Light

Looking out the second-floor lighthouse office window. On this visit, the last ice of the season was slowly drifting into the harbor.

Upper Vault

A typical room in the barracks, reinforced from mortars and light shelling, possibly.

Spiderman

…somebody get the number of that truck! Near the Day Rooms in the Paying Patient ward.

School Ruins

A damaged roof channeled rain onto the adobe walls, cutting them in half. In the distance, a preserved house and the ruins of the Colmor School.

First North and Banks

The Osborn Block (front) and the Twohy (rear) at sunset. In the distance, you can almost make out Globe Elevators. One of my favorite photos of 2013.

Steam Valves

The sun was setting outside, highlighting the textures and lines that made the form of the power plant take a fourth dimension–time.

Female Ward

The common rooms bulge out of the institutional geometry of the wards.

Armored Booth

Catwalk crating, welded over the yard crane operator cab’s windows.

Direct Lightning Strike

This picture is lit by a direct lightning strike of the building. It’s impossible to describe the feeling of being in this giant open building the moment it channeled an electric explosion into the earth.

Red Dock

Negative twenty looks much warmer in retrospect, wouldn’t you say? Taken through the window of a gantry crane cab.

Supply House and Carpentry Shop

At first glance, I thought the center building was a hoist house because of the shape of the window. Now I think this was built as a warehouse and later used as a laboratory.

Mine Level Indicator

The main shaft’s cable spooled with bird castings belies the fact that lives used to dangle from its steel-wound strength. Arrows on the circles would indicate the mine level the cars were currently at.

Blue and Green Glass

Small stained panes and orange brick. I had no idea when I took this picture that the colored glass would turn the insides of the mill into a bright aquamarine. It was a beautiful intersection of nature and industry, in the most unintended way.

Lightning Over FFSH

Connecting the Administration Building to the wards fanning out. Historical photos show cots lining this hallway when the hospital was severely overcrowded. Lit by lightning outside the grounds during a huge thunderstorm.

ADM-Delmar #4- Mill Hell

Mill Hell before the University of Minnesota began developing the area. Now many of the buildings are gone, there are new roads and even bike paths.

Red Line Apartments

Redlining is the practice of shutting certain races out of neighborhoods, and it is still a big problem today. Such behaviors were a big factor in creating the need for these projects.

Reflection of Osborn on Twohy Window

The Osborne Mercantile reflected in Twohy Mercantile’s eastern windows, minutes before subset. The current owner has done a fair job replacing broken windows with plexiglass to keep the elements out.

Oil Transformer Room

This is where the transformers were housed. Note the steel tracks in the floor for moving equipment around the building.

Spinners

A closeup of one of the winding machines that found itself under a leaky section of roof.

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